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Poetry Prize 2018: Results, Short & Long-lists

 

Winners

Short-list

Long-list

 


 

The Ten Winners:

 

Ellen Bass

Poet, Ellen Bass – judge for Poetry Prize 2018

Selected by poet, Ellen Bass
to be published in the Fish Anthology 2018

The Fish Anthology 2018 will be launched as part of the West Cork Literary Festival  (16th July 2018). 
All of the poets and writers published in the Anthology are invited to read at the launch.

First prize is €1,000. 
Second prize is a week in residence at Anam Cara Writer’s and Artist’s Retreat.

 

FIRST

Vernacular Green by Janet Murray (Sheffield, England) (read poem below)

I love how the poem becomes a kind of painting, conjuring a pallet of greens with precise, vivid imagery. A fine example of the use of ekphrasis, this poem illuminates and deepens our appreciation of the English painter. It engages us in the act of seeing, reminds us that attention is itself a form of praise. – Ellen Bass

SECOND 

Our Liberator, Dead by Raymond Sheehan (West Cork, Ireland)

The images of domestic life, simple and poignant, engaged my empathy immediately. Through powerful personal narrative, the poet captures a turning point in history. A poem haunted by fear, yet lit by tentative hope for the future. – Ellen Bass

 

THIRD

Someone Said by Dennis Walder (S. Africa/London)

I was drawn to the mix of irony and pathos in this poem. The breezy tone stands in sharp contrast to the underlying theme of mortality. The poetuses language and diction deftly, with admirable economy. – Ellen Bass

 

 

HONORARY MENTIONS (in no particular order):

America by Partridge Boswell (Vermont, USA)

Energetic, dense with detail, the poem is a rich rendering of a particular time and place. It’s also a fitting love letter to Bruce Springsteen. – Ellen Bass

 

Ode to The Girls Who Deserved What They Got by Ash Adams (Alaska, USA)

A new imagining of Eve that channels raw anger and heartbreak. The poet explores a complex subject through clear, telling details. – Ellen Bass

 

Jesus in a Teacup by Karen Ashe (Glasgow, Scotland)

I love this poem’s cheeky ireverence.  A good example of using humor to explore a complex subject. – Ellen Bass

 

Past Rivermills by Gabriella Attems (Belgium/Austria)

With clear, lyrical descriptions, the poet evokes a strong sense of place. The loss and longing are palpable. – Ellen Bass

 

Approaching Gria by Ann Thompson (Maryland, USA)

A skillfull use of personification. There is a mysterious, mythic quality here that really draws me in. – Ellen Bass

 

Listen by Caroline Bracken (Dublin, Ireland)

The poet uses white space to invoke a mood of expectation and meditation. The sparse images, delivered in short phrases, remind us of the world’s impermanence.
– Ellen Bass

 

Father’s Day by Pat McCutcheon (California, USA)

The well-chosen details carry this poem’s emotional weight. There is real sadness here, yet the final image brings redemption. – Ellen Bass

 

 

 

 

A Little About the Winners:

Janet Murray is a Northerner. She grew up in Lancashire and has spent a large part of her life in Sheffield, South Yorkshire. Her preoccupation is visual art, which is underscored by an interest in people―their dilemmas and how they appear. She has worked as a Senior Manager in public service and completed a Writing MA at Sheffield Hallam University in 2016 (with Merit). Her father was an inventor. She has a partner and two daughters.

Raymond Sheehan  grew up in Beara, West Cork, graduated in English and French from University College Cork in the 70s and has spent most years since then teaching overseas. Now close to retirement, he hopes to spend many happy hours writing, reading, hill-walking and learning more about photography. He has previously been long- and shortlisted for the Fish Short Story and Poetry competitions. 

Dennis Walder was born and brought up in apartheid South Africa. He left long ago, and to the surprise of the interviewer at the office for ‘Dangerous Drugs Firearms and Aliens’, turned himself into a British subject and teacher of English, despite his foreign forebears. Since retiring as a professor of English, he has published short stories and written poetry, and begun a memoir about his mother’s family. He lives in London.

Partridge Boswell is a recipient of the 2017 Edna St. Vincent Millay and Red Wheelbarrow Poetry Prizes, and the author of Some Far Country (Grolier Poetry Prize). Poems published in The Gettysburg Review, SalmagundiThe American Poetry Review, Plume and Poetry Ireland Review. Co-founder of Bookstock Literary Festival and the poetry/music group Los Lorcas, he has troubadoured widely in the US and Europe. He teaches at the Burlington Writers Workshop and lives with his family in Vermont.

Ash Adams is a photojournalist and documentary photographer based in Anchorage, Alaska, USA. Adams studied both poetry and photojournalism at Ohio University, and continues to write poetry when not making images and tending to her two children. Adams’ photography has been featured in The New York TimesThe GuardianThe Wall Street JournalThe Washington Post, Rolling StoneStern, GEO, Aljazeera America, and other national and international publications, and her poetry has been featured in Narrative.

Karen Ashe, 2016 SBT New Writer’s awardee, has been highly-commended in the Bridport prize (twice!), published in Mslexia(twice!) and is busy writing a novel.

Gabriella Attems: From rue St. James to Aisling Cottage. Gabriella walks down a lawn to check on her flowers. She wishes she wore a long dress, held the stem of a campari orange but her arms are scratched and her hair is tangled. She favours blue ones – agapanthus, irises, harebells. She dreams of a kitchen garden, rows of beans and cauliflower. Poppies by the wall steady her. She disappears in the forest planting junipers.

Ann M. Thompson‘s poetry is published in the U.K. (Acumen, here/there, The Journal, Lotus Eater, The North, Staple, Vine Leaves) and U.S. (Ardor, Blast Furnace, Flyover Country Review, Literary Imagination, Lost Country, Mezzo Cammin, Rat’s Ass Review, Tulane Review). Other work includes creative nonfiction (KYSO Flash), short fiction (Best New Writing 2014), lyric essays (Eastern Iowa Review), and video-poems (Gnarled Oak). She is also a Reiki Master, adoptive Mom, and 30-year career writer-editor living in Washington, DC. (www.wellspringofwords.net

Caroline Bracken’s poems have been widely published including in the Irish Times Hennessy New Irish Writing. She was the winner of the iYeats Poetry Competition 2015 and was shortlisted for the Over the Edge New Irish Writer in 2016 and 2017. She was sponsored by Culture Ireland to read her poetry at the Los Gatos Irish Writers’ Festival and the Litquake Festival in San Francisco. She was selected for the Poetry Ireland Introductions Series 2018.

Pat McCutcheon remembers sitting on rocks outside the trailer park where she lived in third grade, pencil and notepad in hand, imagining herself a grownup writer. She grew up to teach English for thirty years at College of the Redwoods, loved students and teaching creative writing, and hated department meetings and grading papers. Her first chapbook was Recovering Perfectionist, and in 2015 a second, Slipped Past Words, was a winner in Finishing Line Press’s Chapbook contest.

 

Vernacular green (i.m Howard Hodgkin1932-2017)

by Janet Murray

 

Hodgkin sees common green

in privet, grass, chestnut husks

blown horsetail, chickweed

crushed under baby’s toe

scum on ponds―pond weed.

 

Not silver olive, willow spinning

green or white, imported

rhododendron, clunking monkey

puzzle tree. Exempt montbretia’s

erect leaves, circling

 

fiery tiger flowers, but if he glimpses

luminous green on the wing-tip

of an escaped parakeet, exposed

by pallid vernacular green, which

hides fairy wings sometimes,

 

in this moment he speaks

Indian green where a greener green

can be unleashed, somewhere between

emerald and jade, a brush dipped

in feathers round a teal duck’s eye.

 

 

 


 

Short-list:

(alphabetical order)

There are 59 poems in the short-list. The total entry was 1,196.

Title

First Name

Last Name

Roughneck (in memoriam)

Mara

Adamitz Scrupe

Ode To The Girls Who Deserved
What They Got

Ash

Adams

Ode to the Mothers

Ash

Adams

Jesus in a teacup

Karen

Ashe

Past Rivermills

Gabriella

Attems

Mirage

Eric

Berlin

America

Partridge

Boswell

Listen

Caroline

Bracken

The Pluot

Megan

Brunkhorst

The Exhibition

David

Cameron

Never never land

Alexandra

Corrin-Tachibana

Today It Happened

Bernie

Crawford

Gap

Edward

Denniston

I Wonder If Hawking Could Write a
Few Elegant Equations

Simon Peter

Eggertsen

In Tune

Kate

Ennals

Crossing

Marian

Fielding

Ode to the First Power

Paula

Finn

At The Huguenot Cemetery

Duane

Geis

The Executioner’s Song

Duane

Geis

Air Brakes

Eithne

Hand

Where she’s at

Jacqueline P

Haskell

Down and out in the upper world

Jacqueline P

Haskell

Crossing

Mike

Herringshaw

Twenty-Three Alternate Names
for the Sixth Extinction

Cynthia

Hughes

Zanzela and Tuba:
Boatmen of the Rapids

Peter

Jarvis

Making Hay

John D.

Kelly

DAY OF THE DEAD

Judith

Krause

Process Poem

Ashley

Lancaster

Oranges and Potato Chips

Jessalyn

Maguire

Sorry – only me.

Tom

Manson

Resolutions

Eamon

Mc Guinness

Father’s Day

Pat

McCutcheon

Inner City ER

Jane

McGuffin

Bakelite Blintzes

Jenny

McRobert

The Picker

Bruce

Meyer

Time Again and Time Again

Joan

Michelson

Of Gastropods

Karla

Morton

Vernacular green

Janet

Murray

Trading Places

Jacqueline

Nolan

The Medusa of High Street

Róisín

Ó Gribín

Readers’ Night at the London
Review Bookshop

Judy

O’Kane

THE SOUNDS OF TRUTH VANISHING

Mary K

O’Melveny

Blessing for the Pilgrims

Nita

Penfold

Threshold

Ella

Richards

Kandinsky’s blue dog

Marion Pym

Schaare

Our Liberator, dead

RAYMOND

SHEEHAN

THE MIDWIFE, ATTENDING,
AND THE CHILD

PATRICIA

SHEPPARD

THE SENATOR’S SHOES

PATRICIA

SHEPPARD

Drot

Rayanne

Sinclair

X

Rajiv

Sinha

The Importance of Thorns

Nicholas

Stiltner

The Industry of the Heavens

Rebekah

Teske

Approaching Gria

Ann

Thompson

Zorbing in the Armagh Brasserie

Gráinne

Tobin

BEES

Maggie

Wadey

Someone Said

Dennis

Walder

Our Irish Garden

Sandra Ann

Winters

 

 


 

Long-list:

(alphabetical order)

There are 225 poems in the long-list. The total entry was 1,196.

Title

First Name

Last Name

Shrike (in Białowieża’s forests)

Mara

Adamitz Scrupe

Roughneck (in memoriam)

Mara

Adamitz Scrupe

Ode To The Girls Who
Deserved What They Got

Ash

Adams

Ode to the Mothers

Ash

Adams

head injury

Julie

Aldridge

Iceberg

Karen

Ashe

Jesus in a teacup

Karen

Ashe

Gardener’s Love Song

Gabriella

Attems

Past Rivermills

Gabriella

Attems

Netherhall Gardens, 1962

Kate

Bailey

A Monster in the Closet

Shaun

Bambery

Henge

Judith

Barrington

Postwar Chocolate

Iris

Bateman

Civilised Man

Tod

Benjamin

A thousand poems

Jackie

Bennett

Mirage

Eric

Berlin

Beeches

Partridge

Boswell

Your Life as a Dog

Partridge

Boswell

Are We Here Yet?

Partridge

Boswell

Ode to Woe

Partridge

Boswell

The Monk at Kells

Partridge

Boswell

America

Partridge

Boswell

Tanzanian Coral

Alice

Bowen

After All the Years

Karen

Bowen

If You’d Asked Joan

Karen

Bowen

Eyewitness Testimony

Caroline

Bracken

Listen

Caroline

Bracken

Dream, Interrupted

P.W.

Bridgman

Figure and Ground

Arthur

Brown

The Hollow

Arthur

Brown

The Patience of Hunters

Katie

Brunero

The Pluot

Megan

Brunkhorst

Ariel Rising

Sue

Burge

Lighting Carmen

Sue

Burge

Holding

Edel

Burke

Acolytes

James Francis

Cahillane

The Exhibition

David

Cameron

Lorde

Stella

Carruthers

where I am coming from

Conrad

Caspari

Feather

Helen

Chinitz

Unremarkable

Don

Colburn

Timeless 11.11

ray

conlon

Kokeshi

Alexandra

Corrin-Tachibana

Never never land

Alexandra

Corrin-Tachibana

We’ll See

Bernie

Crawford

Today It Happened

Bernie

Crawford

Sailing Past Byzantium to the UK

Grainne

Daly

what the celestials never mention

Terry

Dawson

SERMON ON THE MOUTH

Mary Grace

Dembeck

Gap

Edward

Denniston

Rifle

Carol

Dine

My Guardian

Marylou

DiPietro

The Rapacious Heart

Paddy

Doherty

In Your Country

Penelope

Duffy

I Wonder If Hawking Could Write a
Few Elegant Equations

Simon Peter

Eggertsen

Why I Left

Noreen

Ellis

This is a Letter from No One

Joan

English

In Tune

Kate

Ennals

Lament for Seamus Heaney/
Ard file, ( King of poets

Jonnie

Enright

Ghost Train

Charles

Evans

For God’s Sake

Charles

Evans

MOURNING CHANT

Huck

Fairman

The Dean of Discipline

Frank

Farrelly

A Day in March

Lydia

Fesler

She Was Never There

Marian

Fielding

From the Caribbean

Marian

Fielding

Morpho Peleides

Marian

Fielding

Crossing

Marian

Fielding

Wooden Dolphins

C D

Finley

Ode to the First Power

Paula

Finn

The Soddy

Michael

Fleming

The Deep End

Luellen

Fletcher

Researches Chemical & Philosophical

Sharon

Flynn

The Dumb Quiet

Alyson

Fuller-Smith

Open Country

Vanessa

Furse Jackson

#metoo4boys

Bill

Garten

For A Child Dead From
A Playground Fall

Duane

Geis

Weatherman

Duane

Geis

At The Huguenot Cemetery

Duane

Geis

The Executioner’s Song

Duane

Geis

Suicide

Izabella

Grace

Dazzling

Lea

Graham

Atlas Is a Teenager Wearing
Last Week’s Clothes

Stephanie

Graves

How to Catch a Steelhead Trout

Charles

Halsted

#Me

Eithne

Hand

Air Brakes

Eithne

Hand

Unexpected Contact

Jacqueline P

Haskell

Where she’s at

Jacqueline P

Haskell

Down and out in the upper world

Jacqueline P

Haskell

Gideon’s Bible

Cheryl

Heineman

Crossing

Mike

Herringshaw

Poem for the Mother Who
Left Me When I Was Ten

Matt

Hohner

When It Rains

Scott

Hubbartt

Twenty-Three Alternate Names

for the Sixth Extinction

Cynthia

Hughes

From the Motionless Blue

Paul

Ings

A Summer Killing

Lisa

Jacobson

Zanzela and Tuba:
Boatmen of the Rapids

Peter

Jarvis

Fruit Cake

Paul

Jeffcutt

The Slave Bell at Vergelegen

Jean

Jennings

Sixteen

Anita

John

Buying the Cool

Andrea

Johnston

I Swear

Eugene

Jones Baldwin

The Swallows

Laurence

Joy

Wahee Neck

Janet

Joyner

The Boxed Cat Paradox

Janet

Joyner

Velvet Shell

AK

Kaiser

The Greening Effect, Plus Two

Michele

Karas

german love song

Rachel

Kasinski

interior

Maeve

Kelly

Making Hay

John D.

Kelly

On Fisherman’s Row

Olivia

Kenny McCarthy

In the Market at Kabala

Peter

Kent

DAY OF THE DEAD

Judith

Krause

Ownership

Ashley

Lancaster

Process Poem

Ashley

Lancaster

Inventory

Antiony

Lawrence

Look at Me

Fay

Lee

Saltwater

Janet

Lees

Alzheimer’s

Róisín

Leggett-Bohan

The Wood Nymph

Alexandria

Lesicko

Down Donkey Lane

Deborah

Livingstone

Auteur

Robert

Lumsden

A KIND OF COMFORT TO NAME

carolann

madden

Oranges and Potato Chips

Jessalyn

Maguire

Sorry – only me.

Tom

Manson

Wait

Jo

Matthews

Resolutions

Eamon

Mc Guinness

Father’s Day

Pat

McCutcheon

Tom Thumb

Patricia

McEnaney

Inner City ER

Jane

McGuffin

Courtship

Celeste

McMaster

CONFLAGRATION

Marie

McMillan

Snowfall

Jenny

McRobert

The Shipwrecked

Jenny

McRobert

Bakelite Blintzes

Jenny

McRobert

Grounded in Monea

Bruce

Meyer

My Dog

Bruce

Meyer

Pipe Tobacco

Bruce

Meyer

Broadloom

Bruce

Meyer

Ants

Bruce

Meyer

Kitchen Clock

Bruce

Meyer

Bella Arno

Bruce

Meyer

September Wedding, 1954

Bruce

Meyer

The Picker

Bruce

Meyer

Time Again and Time Again

Joan

Michelson

Transfer

Philip

Miller

Bleeding

Philip

Miller

Fun!

Melissa

Mogollon

Or, The Whale

Brookes

Moody

I Wonder

Alana

Moore

Of Gastropods

Karla

Morton

the weak wheel turns

Joshua

Mostafa

The Day I Hear of My
Daughter-in-Law’s Miscarriage

Cris

Mulvey

Eat

Maria

Murphy

Vernacular green

Janet

Murray

Workalanche

Paul

Nesdore

FIX ME WITH A PIN

Maria

Neuda

Others

Kate

Newington

The Fractured Army

Patrick

Nolan

Trading Places

Jacqueline

Nolan

The Medusa of High Street

Róisín

Ó Gribín

THIS OTHER THING

Lani

O’ Hanlon

Marriage and a Long Life

Damen

O’Brien

The Bones of Things

Damen

O’Brien

A Disused College

Mary

O’Donnell

Equipoise

Ita

O’Donovan

The Rocket House

Judy

O’Kane

Garryvoe

Judy

O’Kane

Readers’ Night at the London Review Bookshop

Judy

O’Kane

THE SOUNDS OF TRUTH VANISHING

Mary K

O’Melveny

Echolocation

Rebecca

Olander

Nature Is a Nihilist

Marco

Patitucci

Brigid and the Holy Well

Susie

Paul

My mother sows 3 seeds in
a suburban garden

keith

payne

Olly Olly Oxen Free

Nita

Penfold

Blessing for the Pilgrims

Nita

Penfold

Half-Life

Ruth

Quinlan

All Hallows’ Day

Ellie

Rees

And a float shaped like the Starship Enterprise

Victoria

Richards

Threshold

Ella

Richards

Portrait of the Artist as an Old Woman

Dana

Robbins

The Paper Flower

Dana

Robbins

Fire of Creation

Deanie

Rowan Blank

deep water

Marion Pym

Schaare

The letter

Marion Pym

Schaare

Kandinsky’s blue dog

Marion Pym

Schaare

The Searching

Blanche

Sears

Skin

Raymond

Sheehan

Our Liberator, dead

RAYMOND

SHEEHAN

THE MIDWIFE, ATTENDING,
AND THE CHILD

PATRICIA

SHEPPARD

THE SENATOR’S SHOES

PATRICIA

SHEPPARD

Drot

Rayanne

Sinclair

Old Woman Farm

Rajiv

Sinha

X

Rajiv

Sinha

I dreamt…

Mary

Smith

Thank You

Kathleen

Spivack

Isle of Skye

Don

Staines

Coming Full Circle

Eilis

Stanley

The Importance of Thorns

Nicholas

Stiltner

The Industry of the Heavens

Rebekah

Teske

Duca

Ann

Thompson

Approaching Gria

Ann

Thompson

The Stork

Gráinne

Tobin

Zorbing in the Armagh Brasserie

Gráinne

Tobin

Wood Smoke

Louise

Toomey

Forget-Me-Not

Jean

Tuomey

Yellow Sweater

Shubha

Venugopal

BEES

Maggie

Wadey

Carningli Hill

Lucy

Wadham

Someone Said

Dennis

Walder

Villainelle

Karen

Waldron

Bed Time

Rob

Wallis

A&E, Dad And Me

Jennifer

Watson

Forgiveness

Leland

Whipple

Decorations

Jay

Whittaker

Ocean Held Still

Beau

Williams

The Logistics of Letting Go

Nicholas

Williams

Father

Susanne

Williams

Our Irish Garden

Sandra Ann

Winters

Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy

Jennifer

Wolkin

Sometimes I Think of the Ones

Sarah

Wright

 

 

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Five O’Clock Shadow

I feel like issuing a health warning with this Fish Anthology ­ these stories may seriously damage your outlook – Here the writers view the world in their unique way, and have the imagination, talent, and the courage to refine it into that most surprising of all art forms ­ the short story. – Clem Cairns.


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From the Bering Strait

Every story in this book makes its own original way in the world. knowing which are the telling moments, and showing them to us. And as the narrator of the winning story casually remarks, ‘Sometimes its the small things that amaze me’ – Molly McCloskey


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Scrap Magic

The stories here possess the difference, the quirkiness and the spark. They follow their own road and their own ideas their own way. It is a valuable quality which makes this collection a varied one. Read it, I hope you say to yourself like I did on many occasions, ‘That’s deadly. How did they think of that?’ – Eamonn Sweeney


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Dog Day

Really good short stories like these, don’t read like they were written. They read like they simply grew on the page. – Joseph O’Connor


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The Stranger

The writers in this collection can write short stories . . . their quality is the only thing they have in common. – Roddy Doyle


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The Fish Garden

This is the first volume of short stories from Ireland’s newest publishing house. We are proud that fish has enabled 15 budding new writers be published in this anthology, and I look forward to seeing many of them in print again.


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12 Miles Out – a novel by Nick Wright

12 Miles Out was selected by David Mitchell as the winner of the Fish Unpublished Novel Award.
A love story, thriller and historical novel; funny and sad, uplifting and enlightening.


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Altergeist – a novel by Tim Booth

You only know who you can’t trust. You can’t trust the law, because there’s none in New Ireland. You can’t trust the Church, because they think they’re the law. And you can’t trust the State, because they think they’re the Church And most of all, you can’t trust your friends, because you can’t remember who they were anymore.


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Small City Blues numbers 1 to 51 – a novel by Martin Kelleher

A memoir of urban life, chronicled through its central character, Mackey. From momentary reflections to stories about his break with childhood and adolescence, the early introduction to the Big World, the discovery of romance and then love, the powerlessness of ordinary people, the weaknesses that end in disappointment and the strengths that help them seek redemption and belonging.


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The Woman Who Swallowed the Book of Kells – Collection of Short Stories by Ian Wild

Ian Wild’s stories mix Monty Python with Hammer Horror, and the Beatles with Shakespeare, but his anarchic style and sense of humour remain very much his own in this collection of tall tales from another planet. Where else would you find vengeful organs, the inside story of Eleanor Rigby, mobile moustaches, and Vikings looting a Cork City branch of Abracababra?


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News & Articles

Irish Short Story of the Year. VOTE ! (Mia Gallagher, Fish Short Story Prize Judge, has Story Shortlisted)

14th November 2018
Dear family, friends and colleagues   I’m absolutely delighted that my story ‘Polyfilla’ has been shortlisted for the writing.ie Irish Short Story of the Year with An Post Irish Book Awards.   I’m really gratified to be on such a terrific shortlist, selected from a very strong longlist. My fellow-shortlistees are the wonderful Nuala O’Connor, Róisín O’Donnell, […]

Harry Bauld, Fish Alumni, Publishes Poetry Collection

14th November 2018
The Uncorrected Eye by Harry Bauld Published by Passager Books   A collection of poetry Jo Sarzotti praises for its “roving imagination.”  Read a sample on Passager’s website.   Upcoming Event: Reading at Columbia University November 14, 6 pm Order online   Harry Bauld’s poem, Forty Winters, was published in the Fish Anthology 2017.  Read it […]

Fish Editor Tina Pisco Teaches English in Refugee Camp

1st November 2018
Link: FOLLOW MY BLOG Here are the first three posts on my blog from Nea Kavala Refugee Camp in Greece – Nea Kavala Update #1 It’s Sunday and I have been volunteering in Nea Kavala refugee camp in Northern Greece for one week. I am working in the Women’s Space with Hope, a young woman […]

Fish Anthology 2018 LAUNCH

29th July 2018
WEST CORK LITERARY FESTIVAL, MARITIME HOTEL, JULY  16 It was an unusually dry day for a West Cork summer and the sun shone on the fields across the harbour, and through the wall of glass behind the stage the 100 or so assembled at the Fish Anthology launch could see it all, and the boats […]

Fish Editor Mary-Jane Holmes, Poetry Collection Published

29th July 2018
Heliotrope with Matches and Magnifying Glass by Mary-Jane Holmes (pub 2018 by Pindrop) Mary-Jane Holmes, chief editor with Fish, dazzles with this, her debut collection. These poems range far and wide – from the landscapes, stories and traditions of the North Pennines, rich with dialect; to an Occitan hamlet with its chanterelles and walnut harvests, […]

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