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Memoir Prize 2019: Results, Short and Long-lists

 

Winners

Short-list

Long-list

 


 

The Ten Winners:

Here are the 10 winners as chosen by judge Chrissie Gittins, to be published in the Fish Anthology 2018

Chrissie Gittins

Chrissie Gittins, judge for the Short Memoir Prize 2019

 

The Fish Anthology 2018 will be launched as part of the West Cork Literary Festival  (July 2019).
All of the writers published in the Anthology are invited to read at the launch.

First prize is €1,000.
Second prize is a week at Casa Ana Writers’ Retreat
in Andalusia, Spain, and €300 travel expenses.

 

Here are the ten winners of the 2019 Fish Short Memoir Prize. We have also listed the two memoirs that were closest to making the final ten.

The comments on the memoirs are from Chrissie Gittins, who we thank sincerely for her time and wisdom in judging the prize.

 

 

FIRST

Fejira*// *to cross   by Bairbre Flood (Co. Cork, Ireland)

“This powerful piece gives sharp insights into the lives of refugees living in the Jungle camp near Calais who want to cross the English Channel. In this ‘shadow world at the heart of Europe’ lives are a series of survivals. Survival of failed attempts to cross, survival of torture, survival of health, survival of hearing each other’s stories, survival of boredom and waiting, and finally survival of a terrifying catastrophe within the camp. The writer, a ‘tourist’ in the camp, describes the compelling details of daily life alongside the perpetual despair. A vivid, clear-eyed account which witnesses the facts of these precarious ‘blow-apart lives struggling to start again’ and makes them plain to see.” – Chrissie Gittins

SECOND

In This House by Nicola Keller (Bristol, UK)

“Told from a sister’s point of view this taut piece is cleverly structured around the rooms in a house where the writer and her brother grew up. They must begin ‘cancelling traces’ of their parents’ lives and make impossible decisions about which of their possessions to keep, and how to sell their house. Memories ‘pour through every doorway’ and as she penetrates deeper into her parents’ lives we learn the terrible reasons for her father’s vulnerability and his consequent dependence on his wife’s strength. A careful accounting of lives which continue to reverberate, told unflinching in the face of loss and grief.” – Chrissie Gittins

THIRD

Nebraska by Ceilidh Michelle (Montreal, Canada)

“I liked the voice and the rhythms of the language in this buoyant piece; child-like, the writer races through her sentences intent on conveying as much as possible about her neighbour’s lives, building to an act of violence which chills with its thudding repetition and graphic description. The characters are conjured with wonderful details – a neighbour’s mother has skin ‘grey and lumpy like porridge, boiled egg bags under her eyes as if she was too tired for sleep to fix her’; and the language is full of striking imagery, especially during a long drive to Canada. It ends with an exuberant image as a final flourish.” – Chrissie Gittins

 

COMMENDED: HONORARY MENTIONS

Magnum, Jeroboam, Reoboam, Methuselah by Jupiter Jones (Wales, UK)

“A photograph of the writer’s grandfather comes alive as she meanders back through her memories of him. Her expressed intention is to preserve these memories, which she does by recording with fine details the vicissitudes of his character, his history, and their time together. A rich texture of vivid impressions and stories.” – Chrissie Gittins

The Publican’s Daughter by Wendy Breckon (Devon, UK)

“I enjoyed this lively account of a family getting to grips with taking on a pub, told from the point of view of the teenage daughter. The vibrant details and crackling imagery bring the scenes alive and make it easy to identify with the daughter as she navigates the changes in her and her parents’ lives. Often funny and beautifully observed.” – Chrissie Gittins

Trespass by Gail Anderson (USA)

“The writer carefully sets the scene in this well-paced piece with evocative details and marvellous descriptions of the flora in her Los Angeles neighbourhood. The care shown to a new neighbour by this community is at odds with the tragedy which then takes place. The writer finds hard won acceptance, and continues to express her thoughts and feelings through the powerful motif of the language of flowers. Both moving and chilling.” – Chrissie Gittins

Ginger by Virginia Mortenson (Iowa, USA)

“This piece captures the exuberant minute by minute commentary of a young girl attending her first day at a new school. It’s a treat to read her wide-eyed reactions and responses to her new surroundings and teachers, and to see how she negotiates new friendships. Engaging, full of verve, and brought to life with rich imagery and tripping dialogue.” – Chrissie Gittins

Hot and Cold Tar by Aidan Hynes (Dublin, Ireland)

“The writing in this piece drew me in from the start; a mother charts her young son’s painful skin condition and the lengths they travel to find a cure. Graphic and geographic imagery heightens this journey through a series of likely and less likely solutions. Effective details and dialogue.” – Chrissie Gittins

Between Joy and Sorrow: A Journey of the Hands by David Francis (Victoria, Australia)

“This an ingenious approach which uses the writer’s hands to document his life. They radiate rich veins of memory from playing with a cat and knotting sutures to holding the hand of his first girlfriend. I found the language a little formal but it’s lifted by precise sensory details and descriptions, and fascinating insights into the diverse and vital life of a transplant surgeon.” – Chrissie Gittins

Remembrance of Old Certainties by Michael Casey (Dublin, Ireland)

“I liked the descriptions of religious rituals in this account of an altar boy helping to serve the first mass of the day. The mass doesn’t progress as it should and the responsibility of an excruciating decision falls to him. Jeopardy and suspense propel this piece which ends in a momentous event and a change of heart. Comical to the point of slapstick in places I found it a very enjoyable read.” – Chrissie Gittins

 

ALSO COMMENDED

Learning to Operate by Rowena Warwick

“After a rather hesitant start the narrator takes us through her first days in her first job as a doctor. Her confidence grows as she goes through the routines of her chosen profession and her doubts about her choice are dispelled. The details and description are particularly good as she discovers the beauty inside the human body.”- Chrissie Gittins

Memory Stones by Mary Madec

“A poignant piece in which a sister, whose twin brother was born without words, delves into the history and mystery of their relationship. The accumulation of vivid and sometimes painful memories bears witness to their utter devotion and love for each other.” – Chrissie Gittins

 

 

 


 

Short-list:

(alphabetical order)

There are 56 memoirs in the short-list. The total entry was 735.

 

TITLE

FIRST NAME

LAST NAME

     

Cleanliness is Next to Godliness

Nuala

Allen

Trespass

Gail

Anderson

Born Hungry

Hannah

Austin

The Ginger

C.E.

Ayr

Down in the River

Anneke

Bender

The Publican’s Daughter

Wendy

Breckon

The Binding of Isaac

Iulia

Calota

BEYOND CATEGORY

Linda

Cammarata

The Molly in Me

Gabrielle

Carey

Remembrance of Old Certainties

Michael

Casey

Carrier Testing

Karlyn

Coleman

Mother’s Pride

Susan

Davis

Ripper

Bryony

Doran

The Significance of Blood

Bryony

Doran

Number Thirteen

Alan

Falkingham

Skin Hunger

Beth

Filson

Fejira * // *to cross

Bairbre

Flood

Clamato and Coffee Cake

Rowan

Fookes

Beyond Joy and Sorrow, 
A Journey of the Hands

David

Francis

If…

Ann

Godridge

Wounded

Geoffrey

Graves

Party Bags

Sheila

Gray

This Magnificent Storm of Flight

Alyson

Hallett

THE RED SPIDER

Des

Harris

Why Did The GEM Cry?

Marion

Hoenig

Home Time

Kathy

Hoyle

The Kitty

Andes

Hruby

Hot and Cold Tar

Aidan

Hynes

Growing up in North East Scotland

Christina

Jaffe

Magnum, Jeroboam, Rehoboam, Methuselah

Jupiter

Jones

The Underground Railroad Redux

Eugene

Jones Baldwin

Conceptions

Mimi

Kawahara

In This House

Nicola

Keller

White Dress Black Lie

Melanie

Kerr

Paris 1983

Siobhán

Lennon

Snow and Sister Eugene Marie

Liz

McGlinchey King

The Troubles

Paul

McGranaghan

Fallen Tree, Open Body

Beth

McNamara

Leaving Home

Frankie

Meehan

Nebraska

Ceilidh

Michelle

Sally

Paul

Minty

Ginger

Virginia

Mortenson

The Lean Years

Aefa

Mulholland

The Tissue Seller

Nanette

Naude

A Short History of Swimming

N.

Nye

Priest Island

Katie

Parry

The Wildness

Jasmin

Sandelson

Another Life

Mazz

Scannell

FROM HERE TO ETERNITY, RETURN PLEASE

Daniel

Shaw

New Elizabethans

Peter

Sheal

The Queen and I

Peter

Stewart

The Tight Red Rope

Emily

Tempest

Catching the Drift

Jennie

Walmsley

A Margritte Sky

Donna

Ward

Miss Brodie’s Girls

Lynnda

Wardle

He Got His Fangs

Alexis

Wolfe

The Burn Unit

Brahna

Yassky

 

 

 


 

Long-list:

(alphabetical order)

There are 123 memoirs in the long-list. The total entry was 735.

 

TITLE

FIRST NAME

LAST NAME

     

Cleanliness is Next to Godliness

Nuala

Allen

Trespass

Gail

Anderson

Born Hungry

Hannah

Austin

The Ginger

C.E.

Ayr

Clint

Ann

Baker

HER HAT ON SIDEWAYS

Ivy

Bannister

Down in the River

Anneke

Bender

The Fulcrum: a Fragment of Memoir

Elizabeth

Birchall

Paradise Lost/ Paradise Regained

Martin

Black

The Publican’s Daughter

Wendy

Breckon

Tsurukawa Airi and the Neutron Star

David

Brennan

Christmas Eve

David

Brennan

Searching for Meaning Between The Cushions of my Couch

MADDY

BRODERICK

The binding of Isaac

Iulia

Calota

BEYOND CATEGORY

Linda

Cammarata

The Molly in Me

Gabrielle

Carey

Memories Dreams or Imaginings

Philomena

Carrick

A Ladder of Nails

Mike

Carson

Rembrance of Old Certainties

Michael

Casey

Carrier Testing

Karlyn

Coleman

The Gold Cheongsam

Monica

Connell

learning the Spin

PH

Court

You Didn’t Get It!

Jenny

Cozens

Shrouded in Words

Martin

Cromie

Seeking my Father in the Ordinary

Siobhán

Davies

Mother’s Pride

Susan

Davis

Ripper

Bryony

Doran

The Significance of Blood

Bryony

Doran

The Shape of a Man

Ryan

Dunne

A Bog Of Sweat

Alan

Egan

Number Thirteen

Alan

Falkingham

’tis better to

Yvonne

Fein

Oh Calcutta

Fiona

Fieldhouse

Skin Hunger

Beth

Filson

Never Mind Maid Marion

Tom

Finnegan

ON A RAINY AFTERNOON

Niall

Finneran

Fejira

Bairbre

Flood

Clamato and Coffee Cake

Rowan

Fookes

Between Joy and Sorrow: A Journey of the Hands

David

Francis

If…

Ann

Godridge

Wounded

Geoffrey

Graves

Party Bags

Sheila

Gray

This Magnificent Storm of Flight

Alyson

Hallett

Chasing The Journey

Anne

Hamilton

In The Dark

Diane

Harding

To Beatrice

Holli

Harms

THE RED SPIDER

Des

Harris

Bombs, Bosoms and Baked Beans

Mike

Herringshaw

Salvaging Sweetness

Esther

Hoad

Why Did The GEM Cry?

Marion

Hoenig

Blood Sugar – A Memoir

Natalie

Holborow

Vicious Cycle

Eleanor

Holmes

Home Time

Kathy

Hoyle

The Kitty

Andes

Hruby

The Burn

Deborah

Hunter

Hot and Cold Tar

Aidan

Hynes

Growing up in North East Scotland

Christina

Jaffe

Becoming a Memoir

Calvin

Jolley

An Age of Innocence

Roger

Jones

Magnum, Jeroboam, Rehoboam, Methuselah

Jupiter

Jones

The Underground Railroad Redux

Eugene

Jones Baldwin

I was alone in the light

Alexander

Joseph

Da and the Druid

Phelim

Kavanagh

Conceptions

Mimi

Kawahara

In This House

Nicola

Keller

White Dress Black Lie

Melanie

Kerr

The end is just a beginning

Kate

King

LIFE DRAWING

Jenny

Knight

Paris 1983

Siobhán

Lennon

Bearings

Alex

Lockwood

The Yellow Scarf

GAY

LYNCH

In a Bedouin Dress

Janis

Mackay

Memory Stones

Mary

Madec

Two Evenings

Lyndon

Mallet

Soft-Bodied Animals

Teegan

Mannion

This Time, Not Paradise

Lance

Mason

Under Siege

Lance

Mason

Roses

Ira

Mathur

Lodger

Virginia

Matthews

The Heckler at the Funeral

Tracy

Maylath

Snow and Sister Eugene Marie

Liz

McGlinchey King

The Troubles

Paul

McGranaghan

The Green Door

Carole

Mckerracher

Fallen Tree, Open Body

Beth

McNamara

Leaving Home

Frankie

Meehan

Nebraska

Ceilidh

Michelle

Sally

Paul

Minty

Bicycling Home

Tamara

Moan

Ginger

Virginia

Mortenson

The Lean Years

Aefa

Mulholland

Highway to Hell

J.

Mulligan

The Tissue Seller

Nanette

Naude

It’s Now or Never

Josephine

Nolan

A Short History of Swimming

N.

Nye

In Search of Sherman D.

Gabriela

Paloa

Priest Island

Katie

Parry

Gait of a Barrow Boy

Cassandra

Passarelli

Geology

Elizabeth

Peterson

The Green Hill

Sophie

Pierce

Blue Hours

Francesca

Reece

Spin Cycle

Alexis

Riccio

Carspotting

Silvia

Rucchin

Shining Star

Flor

Salcedo

The Wildness

Jasmin

Sandelson

Another Life

Mazz

Scannell

Fruit Tramp

Carl

Schiffman

The Bad Year

Kara

Seeger

A Game of Cards

Emily

Seftel

Don’t Try This at Home

Jonathan

Segol

The Place Where I’m From

Mai

Serhan

Colonial mirage in Morocco

Edouard

Servy

FROM HERE TO ETERNITY, RETURN PLEASE

Daniel

Shaw

New Elizabethans

Peter

Sheal

Almost Broken

Carly

Sheehan

Pulling back the curtain

Helen

Sterne

The Queen and I

Peter

Stewart

The Tight Red Rope

Emily

Tempest

The Shape of Life 1974-1979

Juliet

Tese

Badger Baby

Poppy

Toland

Catching the Drift

Jennie

Walmsley

A Margritte Sky

Donna

Ward

Miss Brodie’s Girls

Lynnda

Wardle

Learning to Operate

Rowena

Warwick

Night Terror

Megan

Williams

Finding Frances

Megan

Williams

He Got His Fangs

Alexis

Wolfe

The Decision

CC

Xander

The Burn Unit

Brahna

Yassky

 

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