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Flash Fiction Prize 2018: Results, Short & Long-lists

April 10th, 2018 | Uncategorized | Comments Off on Flash Fiction Prize 2018: Results, Short & Long-lists

 

 

Winners

Short-list

Long-list

 


 

 

The Ten Winners:

Sherrie Flick

Author Sherrie Flick – judge for Flash Fiction Prize 2018

 

Selected by judge Sherrie Flick 
to be published in the Fish Anthology 2018

The Fish Anthology 2018 will be launched as part of the West Cork Literary Festival  (16th July 2018). 
All of the writers published in the Anthology are invited to read at the launch.

First prize is €1,000. 
Second prize is an online course writing course with Fish Publishing.

 

The comments on the Flash Stories are from Sherrie Flick.

 

FIRST

The Chemistry of Living Things
by Fiona J Mackintosh (Maryland, USA)

‘What wonderful language in this story. Loop-de-loopy, fizz, and dazzle create a great tension between the internal and external states of the character. The mundane party, the pills that get her through, and then the beautiful, mysterious deer at the end create a depth that makes this story seem longer than its word length. This story has all of the qualities I love in a good piece of flash fiction. It tells a story in a way that is uniformly unique and compelling—compressed, expansive, and surprising.’

 

SECOND

Beige by Gail Anderson (California, living in UK)

‘It’s the quiet nature of this story that drew me in. I love this little victory for the girl—her moment to shine holding a squirrel monkey. The voice is fantastic and such a rich setting, even drawn in neutral tones.’

 

THIRD

Walrus Brings the Dominoes by Laura Mahal (Colorado, USA)

‘This story takes on the absurd with a deft hand. The author doesn’t draw too much attention to the domino-playing, pizza delivering walrus and that’s what makes it click. There’s character development the whole way through with both Joe the guy and the Russ the walrus.’

 

HONORABLE MENTIONS:

Dover by Shannon Savvas (New Zealand)

‘This story has a lot of effective, exacting detail. The building of empathy is a nice surprise that rises up from what could have been a stereotypical interaction but instead shows a sincere moment of humanity.’

 

Oh by Johanna Ellersdorfer (Australia)

‘I love the quick, quiet nature of this piece. Such a small interaction that speaks to the larger implications of how and when we walk and talk in the world.’

 

Sage by Julian Stanford (England)

‘The pacing here is very nice. I like how the man slowly and methodically rids himself of his life. I love that the author didn’t go for some kind of grand conclusion with the ending. The woman nodding seems like the perfect last act.’

 

The Last Limner of Peterborough Town
by Guinevere Glasfurd (Cambs, England)

‘Fantastic first sentence here. This moment of intimacy, a disruption in the way the painter sees himself seen in the world is nicely emphasized with the final simultaneous look at the painting by both characters.’

 

Always Wear a Safety Helmet by Paul Hale (Lincs, England)

‘The author has created a nice triangle of suspense here with the climbing wife Janice, the climbing wronged employee Seamus, and the husband on the ground with binoculars. It provides instant suspense in a classic Hitchcockian way.’

 

Her Troubled Mind’s Reflection by Darren Moorhouse (Kildare, Ireland)

‘There’s something dreamlike in this straightforward scene that also has an edge of dread laced into it. That combination drew me in along with the clear, crisp writing.’

 

In a Nomad’s Land by Craig Kenworthy (Azores, living Seattle, USA)

‘The repetition of “not what happened” works really well to drive the story forward. The author indirectly gives out concrete information by working through this increasingly disturbing negative timeline.’

 

 A Little About the Winners:

Fiona J. Mackintosh was born in New Jersey to English parents, raised in Scotland, and now lives near Washington DC with her American husband. As a result, she can speak several languages, all of them English. Her fiction has been published on both sides of the Atlantic and when she’s not writing, she’s editing reports from clients all over the world. She’s constantly humbled by how hard it is to find the words to show the world in a whole new light.

 

Guinevere Glasfurd is a novelist. Her first novel The Words in My Hand was shortlisted for the Costa First Novel Award and the Authors’ Club Best First Novel Award, 2017. She is a MacDowell Colony Fellow, and wrote The Last Limner of Peterborough Town whilst in residency there. She has been awarded grants from Arts Council England, the British Council and the Society of Authors for her work. She lives in the Fens near Cambridge.

 

Gail Anderson has worked as an animator, musical instrument repair technician and graphic designer, and has lived in the US, the UK and South Africa. She is a winner of the Bodleian Library’s 2016 Parallel Universe Poetry Competition, and her work has been published in the 2018 Aesthetica Creative Writing Annual, Litro and elsewhere. Weekdays she works at the University of Oxford; weekends she can be found in her boat on the Thames.

 

Laura Mahal likes to mix it up. She usually writes overlong literary fiction, but she has recently dabbled with poetry, personal essays, short stories, and is now dipping a toe (all that’s allowed, really) into flash fiction. She’s the Member Liaison for Northern Colorado Writers, which means she can propose that a sister city arrangement be set up immediately between Fort Collins and West Cork—seeing as we share “Wild West” roots and all.

 

Shannon Savvas, a New Zealand writer, divides her life and heart between New Zealand, England and Cyprus. She has been published online and made it to three print anthologies (2017) with a fourth due in 2018. New Year’s Eve 2017, she learnt she’d won the Autumn 2017 Reflex Flash Fiction competition, which gave her delight and encouragement in equal measure. She’s been told not to mention her dogs or cat.

 

Johanna Ellersdorfer grew up in Sydney and has lived in eight different cities in the past six years. She writes, paints and restores art. Her stories have been included in the Spineless Wonders Time Anthology and performed at various Little Fictions events in Sydney. She is currently adrift in Europe. 

 

Julian Stanford is a working father of three, married and burdened with an old house. He writes as much as possible, but also feels the urge to paint and has a full time day job which takes him away a great deal, so flash fiction seems the perfect format. At some future date he would like to try a full menu, but for now it’s all about the amuse-bouche …

 

Paul Hale worked in the Finance Sector, writing reports of various kinds as an employee, and is putting that experience to more enjoyable use in retirement. He lives with his wife in Lincolnshire, who is the first person to read his stories and spot any ‘deliberate’ plot errors. He is a member of a local writers group called ‘Write Away’. They meet monthly and provided the encouragement to enter competitions. He is grateful for their help.      

Darren Moorhouse is a 24 year old student from Ireland. He recently graduated from UCD with a BA in English and Linguistics and is currently completing his Professional Masters in Education, also in UCD, to become a secondary school teacher. Darren is a keen writer of flash fiction, poetry and short stories and has begun work on a trilogy of gritty and hard- hitting YA novels which he hopes to complete in the near future.

 

Craig Kenworthy was born in the Azores Islands. In addition to fiction writing,  he is a poet, a playwright and a recovering lawyer. He’s run 14 marathons but still finds them much less painful than first drafts. He is married to a social worker, Karen Larsen, although she claims it is a trial marriage and at 50 years, she gets to reconsider. Craig lives in Seattle, Washington, U.S.A.

 

 


 

Short-list:

(alphabetical order)

There are 53 flash stories in the short-list. The total entry was 962.

 

Title

First Name

Last Name

Beige

Gail

Anderson

Michael at the Bar

Gail

Anderson

Esmeralda

Stephen

Bergstrom

Sunday

Mary

Bevan

The lost Samurai

Andrew

Blackwood

Doppelganger

Tim

Booth

Thankfully

Mark

Boyden

When your number’s up

Mark

Brom

dear Missus greeves

Claire

Brown

In the Beginning

Paul

Coleman

Not a Pilot

Kathleen

Connor

In Plain Sight

Mark

Dalligan

Oh

Johanna

Ellersdorfer

Vinegar and brown paper

Jane

Fraser

The Last Limner of Peterborough Town

Guinevere

Glasfurd

Running

Izabella

Grace

Morgasm

Robin

Griffiths

Always wear a helmet

Paul

Hale

Gutted

Ceinwen

Haydon

On The Back Stairs of a Dublin Hospital

Eleanor

Hooker

River

Michele

Houlihan

A real celebration

Isobel

Hourigan

Frozen Fish

Mandy

Huggins

Out of Control

Linda

Hutchinson

Late August

Gideon

Jacobs

The Whitest of Lies

Roger

Jones

Mrs. Rose Edwards

Rhea

Jorgensen

The Poachers

Eileen

Keane

IN A NOMAD’S LAND

Craig

Kenworthy

The Storm

Sam

Knight

The Hungry Librarian

Yama

Lake

Strange Frames

Luke

Larkin

Plastic Arm

Rebekah

Lattin-Rawstrone

Wheat Country Weddings

Susan

Lowell

The Chemistry of Living Things

Fiona J

Mackintosh

Walrus Brings the Dominoes

Laura

Mahal

Children of the Moon

Paul

McGranaghan

I’ll Be Back, But I Leave You This

Jose

Medina

Her Troubled Mind’s Reflection

Darren

Moorhouse

Gym Bunny

Cally

Murphy

My Left Thumb

Carla

Myers

The Department

Carla

Myers

What I Saw

Laurence

O’Dwyer

The School Run

Zoe

Owens

Tree on the Shore

Carlos

Perona Calvete

The Rainbow Must Include Zombies

V. Joseph

Racanelli

A Tongue Lashing

Peter

Rodgers

Cavities

Christina

Sanders

Dover

Shannon

Savvas

Collector Girl

Adrian

Scanlan

Remedy

Peter

Schireson

Sage

Julian

Stanford

THE “LED” PIPE

Mickie

Winkler

 

 


 

Long-list:

(alphabetical order)

There are 184 flash stories in the long-list. The total entry was 962.

Title

First Name

Last Name

24 Weeks

Jonathon

Ackroyd

Night on the Town

Hanif

Ali

Beige

Gail

Anderson

Michael at the Bar

Gail

Anderson

Esmeralda

Stephen

Bergstrom

Sunday

Mary

Bevan

Hummingbird

J.T.

Blackie

The lost Samurai

andrew

blackwood

Doppelganger

Tim

Booth

The Silence of Snow

Stephen

Bourke

The Life of Skeletons

Philippa

Bowe

Divinity

Mark

Boyden

Thankfully

Mark

Boyden

The Silver Casino Player

Yvonne

Boyle

God is a left-handed Japanese man

Mark

Brom

When your number’s up

Mark

Brom

Listing to port

dan

brotzel

dear Missus greeves

Claire

Brown

A Simple Solution

Paul

Budd

Dumb Bitch

Rose

Bunch

The Last Post

Letty

BUTLER

A Drunk and a Thief

Philip

Chiemelu

THE BIRTHDAY PARTY

Clare

Chu

New Woman

Jason

Coit

In the Beginning

Paul

Coleman

sparks

chris

connolly

Not a Pilot

Kathleen

Connor

Flight

Ally

Cook

Unloading

Denise

Coville

A Revealing Case

Tim

Craig

The Writer

Martin

Cusack

In Plain Sight

Mark

Dalligan

The Pledge

Maggie

Davies

The Tiny Patch of Red-Tile Roof

Annie

De Benedictis

Misfiring Neurons

Ashling

Dennehy

The Visitor

stewart

devitt

Cracks

Elaine

Dillon

Impact

Elaine

Dillon

Welcome Home

Rick

Donahoe

Proper Coffee

bryony

doran

Oh

Johanna

Ellersdorfer

The Glory of God

Suzanne

Frankham

Sleepless Nights

Lisa

Fransson

Vinegar and brown paper

Jane

Fraser

Gotcha

Adele

Gannon

Dismissal

AMINA

GAUTIER

The Catch

Matthew

Gibson

The Last Limner of Peterborough Town

Guinevere

Glasfurd

My Birthday by Eimear Brady

Izabella

Grace

The Weight of Jewels and Promises

Lucy

Grace

Running

Izabella

Grace

Curable

Robert

Granader

Morgasm

Robin

Griffiths

Tomorrow

Samuel

Guo

Steam

gillian

Haigh

Always wear a helmet

Paul

Hale

Afternoon

Jennifer

Hanna

I Am Vaughn

Lynda

Harris

Gutted

Ceinwen

Haydon

No Smoking

Kevlin

Henney

On the Science and Complexities

of Having Sex in the Family Caravan

While One’s Parents Are There

Kevlin

Henney

A Bigger Stone

John

Herbert

Nice and clean, Freddie.

Percy

Herbert

On The Back Stairs of a Dublin Hospital

Eleanor

Hooker

Shoveling

Colin

Houghton

West of These Hills

Colin

Houghton

River

michele

houlihan

A real celebration

Isobel

Hourigan

Returning

Susan

Howe

Frozen Fish

Mandy

Huggins

Docksons

Merick

Humbert

Out of Control

Linda

Hutchinson

English 101

Amy

J. Kirkwood

Late August

Gideon

Jacobs

A Gut Feeling

Jayne

Jenner

Broken Hearts

Dakotah

Jennifer

ECHOLOCATION

Sandra

Jensen

The Whitest of Lies

Roger

Jones

Mrs. Rose Edwards

Rhea

Jorgensen

The Poachers

eileen

keane

Special Powers

Jane

Keeley

When No One is Watching

Wilma

Kenny

IN A NOMAD’S LAND

Craig

Kenworthy

The Storm

Sam

Knight

Risk

Andrew

Lafleche

The Hungry Librarian

Yama

Lake

Strange Frames

Luke

Larkin

Plastic Arm

Rebekah

Lattin-Rawstrone

The bottomless pit

Anita

Lehmann

Know Thyself

Andre

Lepine

MONKEY

Julia

Lobo Salles

If It Wasn’t For ET

Adam

Lock

The Red Dress

Lisa

Lodico

Brothers

Charlene

Logan Burnett

Wheat Country Weddings

Susan

Lowell

First Love

Ruth

Mac Neely

Distraction

William

MacFarlane

Consanguinity

Fiona J

Mackintosh

The Chemistry of Living Things

Fiona J

Mackintosh

Walrus Brings the Dominoes

Laura

Mahal

Whatever it was he did

Ursula

Mallows

A Hope In Hell

Louise

Mangos

Freedom

ANDREA

marcusa

The Sleepover

Shey

Marque

New Pajamas

Andrea

Martin

After Sunset

Sean

McConville

Doing an Auntie Nellie

Anne

McDonald

Children of the Moon

Paul

McGranaghan

The Mission Of Wool

Dee

McInnes

Bad Boys

Wayne

Mconie

I’ll Be Back, But I Leave You This

Jose

Medina

He Blanked Me

Donatella

Montrone

Her Troubled Mind’s Reflection

Darren

Moorhouse

Parking cars and pumping gas

John

Mulligan

The girl in apartment 24

John

Mulligan

Blue

Tiarnan

Murphy

Gym Bunny

Cally

Murphy

Sewing

Carla

Myers

My Left Thumb

Carla

Myers

The Department

Carla

Myers

LOSING RADMILA

Peter

Newall

The Bite

Stephanie

Norgate

Worth a Thousand Words

Stephanie

Norgate

The Past

Stephanie

Norgate

Midnight at the Services

Stephanie

Norgate

Little Lamb

Alice

Nuttall

Scarlet Ribbons

Róisín

Ó Gribín

The Paris Opera

Sean

O’Connor

What I Saw

Laurence

O’Dwyer

Chaos

Mary

Omnes

The School Run

Zoe

Owens

Tedium

Gabriela

Paloa

Hooch

Jane

Paterson

Tree on the Shore

Carlos

Perona Calvete

Lucky Day

Ralph

Pooler

The Rainbow Must Include Zombies

V. Joseph

Racanelli

Off-Season

ALEX

REECE

Slivered

Caitlin

Richards

Puppy

Caitlin

Richards

Teething

Rachel

Richardson

Boy from Belfast

Laura

Rimando

Two Sides of a São Paulo Knife

Jane

Roberts

A Tongue Lashing

Peter

Rodgers

Beast

Vanessa

Rogers

THE MERMAID’S WAVE.

Sean

Ross

Gooseberry

Joanna

Rubery

Cavities

Christina

Sanders

Running Out

Shannon

Savvas

Welcome to Oz

Shannon

Savvas

Dover

Shannon

Savvas

Collector Girl

Adrian

Scanlan

Not Countin the Times

Glenn

Schiffman

At First Blush

Peter

Schireson

Remedy

Peter

Schireson

Lemons

Anita

Schmaltz

My Dearest Friend

Jacqui

Scholes-Rhodes

Zero Options

Enda

Scott

Swastika

Jacquelyn

Shreeves-Lee

Attic

Jacquelyn

Shreeves-Lee

The End

Chin

Siew Teng

Mortality

Elizabeth

Simpson

Valley Valentine ’98

Michael

Simpson

Revenge

peter

slater

Kathleen

Marilyn

Smith

Sage

Julian

Stanford

Heartfelt Eulogy

Martin

Sturrock

Sister Blue

Mark

Sutz

Starboards

Mark

Sutz

The Disappeared Mouse

Mark

Sutz

Ice Hole

Kate

Tregaskis

Curse of the Lucky Bamboo

Shubha

Venugopal

A Clash of Symbols

Dennis

Walder

Teaching Rounds

Richard

Weiner

Ever after

Ellen

West

Birth Control

Catherine

Westwell

Higher

Clare

Weze

The Smile

Terri J

Williams

Bluebell Perfection

Judith

Wilson

Windigo

Aji

Wings

THE “LED” PIPE

mickie

winkler

On the Wrong Side

Adam

Wohnoutka

This Our Daily Bread

Sharon

Wong

Effective Communication

Fliss

Zakaszewska

Let’s Dance

Jane

Zingale

Short Memoir Prize 2018: Results, Short & Long-lists

April 1st, 2018 | Uncategorized | Comments Off on Short Memoir Prize 2018: Results, Short & Long-lists

 

 

Winners

Short-list

Long-list

 


 

The Ten Winners:

Marti Leimbach

Marti Leimbach, Short Memoir Judge 2018

Selected by judge Marti Leimbach 
to be published in the Fish Anthology 2018

The Fish Anthology 2018 will be launched as part of the West Cork Literary Festival  (16th July 2018).
All of the writers published in the Anthology are invited to read at the launch.

First prize is €1,000.
Second prize is a week at Casa Ana Writers’ Retreat
in Andalusia, Spain, and €300 travel expenses.

 

The comments on the memoirs are from Marti Leimbach.

FIRST

What Was Once A City
by Marion Molteno (S. Africa/London, UK)

“The terrific energy of the writing conveys the chaos of the Mogadishu, and the writer is willing to not only show us the realities of the city’s war time demise, but her own naïve notions, her frank ignorance, her earnestness and budding bravery in the face of it all. The heroes in such circumstances are never the outsiders, as the author points out, but those who take measures to help others within the small circle of their own reach. An honest glimpse into the efforts of someone who wishes to help in a situation too great for anyone to fully succeed. Wonderful transformation and insights in this short, impressive piece.”   M.L.

 

SECOND

Where the Track Forks Left and Where the Track Forks Right
by Jane Fraser (Wales)

“A quiet, beautiful piece that charts the unclear path of a woman in love with a man, not her husband. The balance of desire and regret, the tremendous price of mid-life love, the understandable need to escape from a loveless marriage even at the expense of her own children, are all captured in a few thousand words. And every page oozes with a sense of place and time. The author achieves all this while making it appear effortless. What a lovely read.”   M.L.

 

THIRD

Glue by Ruth O’Shea (Aran Islands, Ireland)

“I particularly like the first few sections of this inventive piece. There is a kind of urgency right away as the family crosses a border with a richness of language and detail make it feel incredibly real. Wonderful portrayal of a particular domestic life, brought alive in a set of small scenes that make it feel as though the reader is flipping through an album of memories.”   M.L.

 

HONORARY MENTIONS

 

Banbridge Lass by Wendy Breckon (Devon, UK)

“This is an atmospheric piece with a lot of immediacy to it. In the early pages, the author often divides up her sentences, creating phrases that are punctuated as though they are sentences. While I recognized this was a stylistic choice, I found it distracting and kept wanting to reorganize the words so that they conformed to a more conventional grammar. As the narrative continues, the spliced up sentences seem less frequent and the flow is far better. The characters are well developed in only a short space and the writing is full of wonderful details that give the work lots of authority. I love the haircut and its aftermath, Aunt May, the slightly creepy uncle and the very stern, rather awful, father. We only get a small smattering of his character early on. I think the author might have him utter something disapproving of Wendy earlier on so that when he is even worse later we see a deepening of that character development.”   M.L.

 

Midwife’s Daughter by Saffron Marchant (Hong Kong)

SONY DSC

“An engaging piece that combines grisly facts with a sense of humour and the day-to-day realities of motherhood. I was somewhat confused by the colostomy bag attached to her mother after James’s birth as I thought they were as a result of fistulas and not bladders that had been perforated by a surgeon during a caesarean, but I am not an expert on these things. The piece gets stronger when specific scenes are presented and acted out, rather than the more generally related. Consistent tone, a strong narrator and the midwife, herself (the writer’s mother) is especially well-drawn.”   M.L.

 

Documented by Pauline Cronin (San Francisco, USA)

“I love the misguided application of love from the father, the dutiful daughter who does her best to please him and to hold onto her own sense of self at the same time. The details about the need for money and better shoes through the winter are great. Lovely ending that opens out onto more questions.”   M.L.

 

Shell by Deborah Martin (Glasgow, Scotland)

“The familiar office politics and the narrator’s sense of marginalisation deepen through out the narrative. Anyone with experience of depression will recognize the truth of this writing and the manner in which all of us imagine the lives of others’ differently to their real lives. It was ambitious to try to span so much time in so few pages and the sense of scene is a little thin at time. However, it was a pleasure to read such a thoughtful piece about a difficult subject.”   M.L.

 

The Logic Of Blue Pyjamas by Fiona Montgomery (Glasgow, Scotland)

“The memoir is usually a genre in which the author recalls and dramatizes past events, but what if the specifics of those events eludes its author? This is the dilemma of the author of The Logic of Blue Pyjamas, whose memory of what is sometimes called “historic sex abuse” is patchy or absent. This lack of conscious memory makes it a unique kind of memoir, one fashioned on external information from experts on the subject, yet it manages to also be personal. The reader can’t help but want more details and shares the narrators yearning for distinct, vivid recollection.”   M.L.

 

Without Breaking The Air by Christina Sanders (Somerset, England)

“The author has given a nice structure to this piece, which is a reflection on a relationship with a father with alcoholism. The father’s character is particularly well drawn with some great dialogue that is used very well to deepen characterization. A particularly lovely opening as well as a stunning last paragraph.” M.L.

 

 Wilderness by Paul McGranachan (Strabane, Ireland) 

“This eery, gruesome little piece carries a lot of authority due to it’s author’s matter-of-fact tone. There is no doubt about it, the piece makes for difficult reading, especially as the suffering and death of the animals is, by the writer’s own admission, entirely pointless. I longed for the writer to take a position against the established practices of the lab, but that never arrived. I appreciated the way in which details were given, as well as the deftness of language that permeates the whole of the piece. The paragraph that begins, “It contains six miniature jam jars…” is a great example of what I mean. I love the corridors being described as having an “aquarian gloom” and I particularly like the character of the professor, who almost seems fictional in his sadistic behaviour toward the student he has singled out for bullying. While there are so many direct addresses that, at times, the piece seems not to be consistently first-person nor second person, I quite like it.”    M.L.

 

 


 

Short-list:

(alphabetical order)

There are 52 memoirs in the short-list. The total entry was 780.

 

Title

First Name

Last Name

Banbridge Lass

Wendy

Breckon

Steel Toe Capped

David

Brennan

Miracle

Catherine

Brophy

To Whom It May Concern

Carolyn

Butcher

Halcyon Days

Susanna

Clayson

In the Winter of ’47

Martin

Cromie

Documented

Eanlai

Cronin

Pain Scale

Deborah

Darling

Life

Jack

Durack

The Time of Runcorn

Charles

Evans

The Spy Who Might have been

Charles

Evans

Where the Track Forks Left and Where the Track Forks Right

Jane

Fraser

Roadkill: An American Memoir

Soma Mei Sheng

Frazier

Offer It Up

Jason

Gillikin

The Small Brown Suitcase

Jonathan

Haylett

The crack in the wall

Niall

Herriott

March Madness, 1974

Richard

Holeton

Pee in here

shelagh

klein

Swimming in The World Turned Upside Down

la

Jennings

The Scream

Kathleen

Langstroth

SINGING ALONG

George

Mackay

Midwife’s Daughter

Saffron

Marchant

Shell

Deborah

Martin

The Arsenic Year

Anna

McGrail

The Gods of West Ham

Paul

McGranaghan

Wilderness

Paul

McGranaghan

Tall Table

Kendra

McSweeney

Ashes of Dad

Kyung

Meill

What was once a city

Marion

Molteno

The Logic of Blue Pyjamas – Reading into my life

Fiona

Montgomery

When The Birds Were Swooping

Stephanie

Mowry

ZJ 699

Breandan

O’Broin

Glue

Ruth

O’Shea

War is not suitable for Children

Judith

OConnor

The Very Word

lara

palmer

Excerpts From A Wedding Journal

Lynne

Pearl

125

Elizabeth

Rakow

Taint

David

Ralph

Mowsley

Ellie

Rees

Once Yugoslavia

Jane

Richardson

Without Breaking the Air

Christina

Sanders

Good Christian Soldier

morgan

schulz

On Getting Vivian

Sarah

Sleeper

The Junior Cadet

ian

tew

Smile

Boris

Thomas

The Routine Operation

Christopher

Thompson

On Hearing the Voice of God in the Desert

J.W.

Vass

Wall

John C.

Weir

Raw Space

Bradley

Wester

Heading Out

M.F.

Whitney

Night Terror

Megan

Williams

Back with Daisy

Neil

Wilson

 

 

 


 

Long-list:

(alphabetical order)

There are 179 memoirs in the long-list. The total entry was 780.

 

Title

First Name

Last Name

     

A Good Day at the Gym

Steven

Ashley

The Minister’s Daughter

Lizzie

Bailie

Beloved Bodies

Judith

Barrington

A Woman Alone

Sue

Bevan

The Flames

Mary

Black

When We Were Very Young

Oliver

Black

Beaver Celtic and the Genative Case

Martin

Blayney

Ms. Gaijin Learns Something

Elizabeth

Bodien

Banbridge Lass

Wendy

Breckon

Ghosts of Bone and Flesh

David

Brennan

Steel Toe Capped

David

Brennan

Miracle

Catherine

Brophy

Myself as a puff of dust: a ghost story.

Jane

Bryce

Gunpowder, Treason and Plot

Stephanie

Buckle

Cloud Forest Diaries

Miles

Burrows

To Whom It May Concern

Carolyn

Butcher

Clay Faces

Kerry

Campion

History of Love and Drugs: A Midterm

Laura

Carey

Wee Scottish Memoir

Sheila

Chambers

Eunice Aphroditois

Anna

Chilvers

Halcyon Days

Susanna

Clayson

Driving lessons

Jo

Colley

In the Winter of ’47

Martin

Cromie

Documented

Eanlai

Cronin

My Two Uncle Pats.

Deirdre

Crowley

Pain Scale

Deborah

Darling

Non Panicatus

Janet

Denny

Internally Displaced

Heather

Derr-Smith

Leaving

Beth

Ditson

The Chain Gang Suitcase

Ryan

Dunne

Life

Jack

Durack

Never Say Die

Sharon

Eckman

Seapro Summer, 1979

Julian

Edelman

Casting the Ballot

Julian

Edelman

Learning to Speak about Death

Simon Peter

Eggertsen

Jean, Jeanie

Helene

Elysee

The Girl Who Eloped

Genevieve

Essa

The Time of Runcorn

Charles

Evans

The Spy Who Might have been

Charles

Evans

Les Beatniks – August 1969

Andrew

Fear

The Endorphin Solution

Yvonne

Fein

What Follows

Frances

Fischer

A good black coat

Mary

Fox

Under the Singer

TOM

FOX

The Day the Generals Take Over

Jane

Fraser

Where the Track Forks Left and Where the Track Forks Right

Jane

Fraser

Roadkill: An American Memoir

Soma Mei Sheng

Frazier

The Gift

Peter

Freckleton

At Times Helpless, never Hopeless: Our Journey with IBD

JENNIFER

FREEDMAN

Lunniagh

Maureen

Gallagher

Verona

David

Gehring

The Trainspotter’s Guide to Virginity

David

George

Offer It Up

Jason

Gillikin

THE DEFAULT PSYCHIATRIST

R.C.

Goodwin

What’s in a Name?

Ian

Gouge

The Girl from New Jersey

Morgan

Griffin

The Rain and the Fog; the Ghost and the Spider

Linda LeGarde

Grover

Racing the Wind

Jolene

Gutierrez

This is a Love Story

Jane

Hacking

The Visits

Jane

Harrington

The Upper Saloon

John

Harris

From A Memoir of an Anthropologist: The Road to Byumba

Kirstan

Hawkins

The Small Brown Suitcase

Jonathan

Haylett

Learning

Maura

Hehir

My Name is Rocky Heller. I am Champion of the World

Ruth

Heller

The crack in the wall

Niall

Herriott

Two Weeks

Euwan

Hodgson

The Little Things

fergus

hogan

March Madness, 1974

Richard

Holeton

PASSING CLOUDS

Brian

Holland

Our Gang and Other Warfare

Richard

Hoskin

Monuments

Teresa

Hudson

Banjo Heaven

Cynthia

Hughes

Authorised Personnel Only

Margaret

Innes

Someone Else’s Money

Liz

Jones

Shift Change

Linda

Jorgenson

Father Mac

Lucienne

Joy

A Father’s Flowers

Pat

Keane

The System

Bella

Kemble

Only Me

James Allan

Kennedy

Pee in here

shelagh

klein

Swimming in The World Turned Upside Down

Dawn

Kozoboli

My Brief Career in an Irish Asylum

Christine

Lacey

The Scream

Kathleen

Langstroth

Written Twixt My Sheets

Aida

Lennon

Duck pâté and the First Law of Thermodynamics.

Roger

Lightfoot

City of Many Ironies

Robin

Lloyd-Jones

Storybook Wedding

Nancy

Ludmerer

Elymus Repens

Niamh

MacCabe

SINGING ALONG

George

Mackay

Countdown

Gordon

Mackenzie

Farewell Hurricane

Helen

Madden

It’s Only a Day

Kirsty

Malesev

Midwife’s Daughter

Saffron

Marchant

Shell

Deborah

Martin

January in Harlem

Margaret

McCaffrey

Corn Souffle

Maureen

McCoy

Dungeons, Church and Beach: Memories of Past Summers

Veronica

McGivney

Tyburn Street

Anna

McGrail

The Arsenic Year

Anna

McGrail

The Gods of West Ham

Paul

McGranaghan

Wilderness

Paul

McGranaghan

Grandma’s Eyes

Wayne

Mconie

Tall Table

Kendra

McSweeney

Ashes of Dad

Kyung

Meill

The Bastard Species

Laura

Merritt

Tears In Rain

Erinna

Mettler

My Father, The Man in the Moon

Tamara

Miles

What was once a city

Marion

Molteno

The Logic of Blue Pyjamas – Reading into my life

Fiona

Montgomery

Goodbye Robert

Caron

Moran

When The Birds Were Swooping

Stephanie

Mowry

My father walking

Janette

Munneke

Last chance

Jane

Murrell

Found: In Pieces

Melissa

Neff

‘Crow, crow’

Kerri

ní Dochartaigh

ZJ 699

Breandan

O’Broin

My First Confession

Anthony

O’Farrell

The Pig

Alice

O’Keeffe

The First Durex Machine in Cork

Eamon

O’Leary

St Bernard Spoiled the Party

Eamon

O’Leary

Glue

Ruth

O’Shea

The Family Flaw

Alexandra

O’Sullivan

War is not suitable for Children

Judith

O’Connor

Lost: a Memoir of My Sister Pamela

Paula Spurlin

Paige

The Very Word

lara

palmer

Coming In Off The Ledge

Elizabeth

Palombo

Special

Sarah

Passingham

Excerpts From A Wedding Journal

Lynne

Pearl

Farmboy Goes To War

Doug

Pender

I, Blind Alien

Petra

Perkins

Gnocchi

Amalia

Pistilli

THE YOUNG ARCHAEOLOGIST

catryn

power

White Girl in a Strange Land

Candida

Pugh

I’ve Never Been to Spain

Janice Nabors

Raiteri

125

Elizabeth

Rakow

Taint

David

Ralph

THIS IS HOW WE SAY GOODBYE

ALEX

REECE

Mowsley

Ellie

Rees

Once Yugoslavia

Jane

Richardson

Sacred Landing

Silvia

Rose

Without Breaking the Air

Christina

Sanders

A hundred tides

Jacqui

Scholes-Rhodes

Good Christian Soldier

morgan

schulz

Little Dog of my Youth

Dorothy

Schwarz

Changing Places

Elizabeth

Simpson

On Getting Vivian

Sarah

Sleeper

Plight

Clorinda

Smith

Lost and Found in La Triana

Tasha

Smith

Biscuits and Squash

Kerriann

speers

Who Knows

Neill

Speers

Write What You Know

Kathleen

Spivack

Safe in the Arms of Jesus

sally

st clair

One Does Not Simply Love

Tonya

Streeter

Muddy Path. Incidents in a childhood, 1954 – 1965

Myna

T

The Junior Cadet

ian

tew

At Least We Tried

George

Thomas

Smile

Boris

Thomas

More Than This

Mary

Thompson

The Routine Operation

Christopher

Thompson

Running on Empty

Fran

Tomlin

Making it Fit

Jenny

Toune

Failed Disney Love Story

Jennifer

Twomey

On Hearing the Voice of God in the Desert

J.W.

Vass

Gritty is the Nature of the Sun

Matthew

Villarreal

The House by The River

Catherine

Watkins

Wall

John C.

Weir

Raw Space

Bradley

Wester

Look Straight Ahead

Clare

Weze

Heading Out

M.F.

Whitney

Gilt, Guilt and Acorns

Barbara

Whittle

Magical Guilt 2

elizabeth

Wilde McCormick

Magical Guilt

Elizabeth

Wilde McCormick

Achha

Carl

Williams

Night Terror

Megan

Williams

Seasons in the Sun

Anne

Wilson

Back with Daisy

Neil

Wilson

She of the Sea

Morna

Young

 

Short Story Prize 2017/18: Results, Short & Long-lists

March 17th, 2018 | Uncategorized | Comments Off on Short Story Prize 2017/18: Results, Short & Long-lists

Billy O'Callaghan

Billy O’Callaghan, judge for the 2017/18 Short Story Prize

 

Winners

Short-list

Long-list

 


 

The Ten Winners:

Selected by judge Billy O’Callaghan
to be published in the Fish Anthology 2018

 

First: Clippings by Helen Chambers (England)

Is awarded €3,000, one thousand of which is for travel to the launch of the Fish Anthology 2018, and a short story workshop at the West Cork Literary Festival in July 2018.

 

Second: Herr Seigfried Ottmar by Thiva Narayanan (Malaysia)

Is awarded a week in residence at Anam Cara Writers’ Retreat and €300.

 

Third: Beatitudes by Janet Smith Moore (USA)

Is awarded €300

 

Honorary Mentions:

 

He Writes by Travis Elsum (Australia)

 

 

Yana by Georgina Eddison (Ireland)

Hope is a Thing With Feathers by Georgina Eddison (Ireland)

 

Ginger Snaps by Linda Edwards

 

Psittacus Erithacus by Percy Herbert (England)

 

 

Cranberry Sauce by Emma Seaman (England)

 

 

Drive All Night by Alan S. Falkingham (USA)

 

 

 

From all of us at Fish we congratulate the writers of the ten stories selected by Billy for publication in the Fish Anthology 2018. There were 1,170 entries and the competition was very tough. Thank to Billy O’Callaghan for his careful attention. We appreciate his interest and support of Fish’s endeavour to publish new and aspiring writers. We are delighted that these ten stories will make for an anthology of excellent work. We look forward to meeting the writers and hearing them read at the launch at the West Cork Literary Festival in July.

– Clem Cairns – 

 

Billy O’Callaghan’s comments on the stories: 

Reading these stories, also those that fell short of the final cut, was a real pleasure but also quite a challenge. The standard of this work is high, and even the ones that didn’t make the anthology had so much about them worth admiring, not just in terms of the stories being told but also in the polish of the sentences, the development of the characters and, especially, the emotional impact these writers managed to wring from just a few pages. Aware of just how much was at stake, I struggled in particular to separate the top five stories, and loved them all for different reasons, and it was only after several readings that I settled on my final order. On another day, and with another judge, the results could very well be different.

 

Clippings – Just exceptional. I was a bit sceptical at first of the structure, but the story unfurls wonderfully. Incredibly emotional, truthful and heartfelt. Beautifully drawn characters. I read this several times over the past two weeks and as I sit here now, I want to read it again. It’s a story that has left a deep impression on me.

Herr Sigfried Ottmar – This one was so beautifully done. Measured and accomplished storytelling, with a strong sense of authenticity and the characters vividly rendered. The ending was perhaps inevitable, yet unavoidable, and no less affecting for that.

Beatitudes – Very well written, and clearly the work of an extremely talented writer. Fine dialogue, beautiful pacing. Deeply moving story, too. Real characters, and such a great sense of authenticity. I read it several times, and it seemed to get better with each pass.

He Writes – The pacing of this story is so impressive. The language is utterly clean and objective, and yet somehow full of emotion and humanity. The story itself seems slight and yet, in its way, immense. This one came very close for me.

Yana – Another really excellent story. Sad and moving, and beautifully told. At times the sense of tragedy is almost unbearable, and yet there is such a gleam of humanity that makes it so compelling. A beautiful depiction of a small life and the vagaries of fate.

Ginger Snaps – This one displayed a wonderfully light touch. The narrative was suitably flighty and yet, at the same time, cleverly plotted. I was very impressed. And the twist at the end is just terrific.

Hope is a Thing With Feathers – Again, a very accomplished piece of writing, with nothing at all about it to dislike. When stories are of such a standard, it is simply a matter of favouring those that resonate in some personal way. This one was excellent, vividly told and deeply resonant. A worthy inclusion to the anthology.

Cranberry Sauce – Well written and well constructed. A real-world problem, nice build-up of tension, and narrative handled with sensitive vulnerability. Best of all, though, there is just a lovely lightness of touch.

Drive All Night – Reading this, I had, once again, the sense of very accomplished storytelling. Good build-up of tension, decent dialogue, though a tad melodramatic and overblown. Some really lovely details elevated this one.

Psittacus Erithacus – A good, straightforward story. Gentle, nicely written.

 

 

 


 

Short-list:

(alphabetical order)

There are 54 stories in the short-list. The total entry was 1,170.

Hope is the Thing With Feathers

Georgina

Eddison

Sin

Georgina

Eddison

Yana

Georgina

Eddison

Plenty of Time, Joan

Jane

Fraser

LAYBY LULLABY

Katayoun

Medhat

TRESPASS

Katayoun

Medhat

The Natural

Paul

Mitchell

Beatitudes

Janet

Moore

Loveoid

J. L.

Morin

The Fish

Helen E.

Mundler

The Return of Waldo Jeffers

Gavin

Murphy

Herr Siegfried Ottmar

Thiva

Narayanan

living the dream

Martin

Nathan

Plunging into Peru

Helen

Newdick

Clean

Giles

Newington

THE LAST HURRAH

Cláir

Ní Aonghusa

Sunglasses

Stephanie

Norgate

Light Rising from Below

Sophie

Nussle

Elizabeth’s Kitchen

Eileen

O’Donoghue

Magma

Mary

O’Shea

SNAP SNAP BABY

Kate

Oriol

the pin

G. L.

Osborne

Mutton Curry

Richard

Philip

Home

Ian

Priestley

Take Her Fishing

John

Pringle

The Public Record

David

Rea

THE EULOGISTS

ALEX

REECE

Mrs Browning’s legacy

Peter

Rodgers

Whisht up a while will you!

John

Rodgers

Breaking News

Gregory

Rosenstock

War from the Words

David

Rubenstein

Gutless Living

Natalie

Rule

A Light in the Green Woods

RAYMOND

SHEEHAN

Papillon

Jo

Sinclair

What You Don’t Know

Tracey

Slaughter

Storybook

Emma

Smith-Stevens

An Ounce of Truth

Penn

Spell

Ambush

Jo

Spencely

A Blue Silk Scarf

Meri

Spencer

Independence Day

Jenny

Steel

Last Sortie

P J

Stephenson

MilkEyed Mender

Kerry

Swash

A Fair Bargain

Robert

Temple

Crosshouse

Eleanor

Thom

Kissing a Goldfish

Eve

Turner

Fractions

Gabriel

Valjan

Becky and the Devil in an Act of Creative Destruction

Cady

Vishniac

JUST GIVING

Jennie

Walmsley

The Thrill of the Chase

Rick

Williams

Fair and Square

Alison

Withey

There is a Spectre

Christopher

Young

 

 


 

Long-list:

(alphabetical order)

There are 180 stories in the long-list. The total entry was 1,170.

Title

First Name

Last Name

Gabe

Pernille

AEgidius

The Arrow

Angela

Antle

FAMILY LOVE, BUT NOT THE NORMAL KIND

James

Arnold

NO ORDINARY LOVE

James

Arnold

The Sixpence Quilt

Karen

Ashe

Still Clinging…

Cait

Atherton

Two Cents

S

Baldwin

Adjectives

Xanthi

Barker

Gay Blade

Michael

Barnes

Attempted Closure

Andreas

Bergsten

A motionless stuffed bear

Judy

Birkbeck

Gold

Judy

Birkbeck

549

Evelyn

Blackwell

Left-handed jumpers

Peter

Blair

Ice Cold in London

Martin

Blayney

Deliveries

Kevin

Bohnert

Reservoir

Alice

Bowen

Her Green Mohair Jumper

Edwina

Bowen

FINISTERRA

Rosalind

Brackenbury

Muriel

David

Bray

The Caravan

dan

brotzel

Owl Eyes

Mary

Brown

Little Sky

Ursula

Brunetti

Mr Hatch’s Crime

Justine

BUDENZ

Global Relations

Kathryn

Burke

The Deciding Factor(y)

John

C Mundow

Lifeline

Lauren

Carroll

Landbound lullabies

Selma

Carvalho

Clippings

Helen

Chambers

Jewel Thief

Cliff

Chen

Nonlocality

Cliff

Chen

Caitlin’s two sheets of A4

Alasdair

Chisholm

Lennie’s ode to normality

Alasdair

Chisholm

The Pond

Veronica

Ciastko

John-John

pauline

clooney

Impact Report

Matthew

Coburn

The Second Arrival

Jonathan

Colvson

We Can All Have as Many Words as We Like

Chrs

Connolly

Don’t Kiss Trees

jacqui

corcoran

Dry Food

jacqui

corcoran

The Call

Hugh

Costello

Trip Switch

Maureen

Cullen

Undeclared

Michael

Cumiskey

The Sins of the Fatherland

Katherine

Davey

Fragile

Helen

de Búrca

Hovitch and Boskovsky

Barrie

de Lara

Sleeping Dogs

Beth

Ditson

Power of Attorney

Freda

Donoghue

Eagle Soaring

Natalie

Dovkants

An Atheist’s Prayer

Ryan

Dunne

Sin

Gina

Eddison

Some Days Even the Goldfish

Gina

Eddison

One. Two, Three, Four, Five . . .

Gina

Eddison

Time

Gina

Eddison

The Fall

Gina

Eddison

Siren

Gina

Eddison

Ginger Snaps

Linda

Edwards

The Road to Aragon and Triolet

Michael

Elias

The Third Stroke

KM

Elkes

He writes

Travis

Elsum

Two Lost Souls

tracey

emerson

Drive All Night

Alan

Falkingham

Mottled Light

Juliana

Feaver

Roses Smell Like Fear

Olivia

Fitzsimons

Caravaggio

Stephen

Flanagan

Suir River Bridge

aingeala

flannery

Dolores

Mary

Fox

Gilgamesh ward

Mary

Fox

Plenty of Time, Joan

Jane

Fraser

The Empress Strikes Back

Peter

Freckleton

Love in the Age of Porn

Jon

Fried

Kebab and Fried Aubergine

Dean

Gessie

Brew

Pia

Ghosh Roy

Cocktail

Mark

Godfrey

Guilt

Robert

Golding

The Interrogator

Robert

Golding

People Like Us

Pippa

Griffin

Kicking Like Billy-Oh

ledlowe

guthrie

The Intruder

Christopher

HALL

The Forgiveness of Sand

Robert

Hamilton

Cereal and Fire

Holli

Harms

You Scratch My Back

Wayne

Herbert

Psittacus Erithacus

Percy

Herbert

Blood on the Cross

Euwan

Hodgson

42C

Patrick

Holloway

Gingerbread

Anthony

Howcroft

Milfoil

Charleen

Hurtubise

The Funeral

Gavin

Jackson

As Yet Untitled

Ingrid

Jendrzejewski

Eva Sturm

Martin

Keating

Amor Fati

Rose

Keating

Your Dream Life Come True

Kevin

Keely

Waiting for the Russians

Stella

Klein

Freight

Jen

Knox

The Plagiarist

David

Krasner

What Happened Tomorrow

James

Lawless

Pero’s Promise

Tamara

Lazaroff

True Colours

karen

lethlean

Typecasting

Morag

Lewis

A Silvery Fish

Julie

Liston

On the way to Frida Kahlo’s House

Helen

Macrae

The Apple of His Eye

Deirdre

Manning

After The Bomb

Vincent

Marmion

The Henry Effect

Tracy

Maylath

The Sea Beyond

Kevin

Mc Dermott

Michael L Straight from Hell

Maisie

McAdoo

Bloo Red

Peter

McClelland

Lizaveta Lives a Little

Ruth

McConnell

THE FLOWER AND THE SERPENT

Lisa

McDonald

Beachcomber

Connor

McElwee

Sticks and Stones

Judith

McGinn

The boat from Dun Laoghaire

Mark

McGlynn

The Devil’s Kiss

Rachel

McHale

The Gospel Truth

Barbara

McKeon

One-legged Seagulls

Wayne

Mconie

TRESPASS

Katayoun

Medhat

LAYBY LULLABY

Katayoun

Medhat

The Natural

Paul

Mitchell

Beatitudes

Janet

Moore

Loveoid

J

Morin

Ruby Mine

Virginia

Mortenson

The Fish

Helen E.

Mundler

The Return of Waldo Jeffers

Gavin

Murphy

Machine Gun Mickey

Gavin

Murphy

Herr Siegfried Ottmar

Thiva

Narayanan

living the dream

Martin

Nathan

Plunging into Peru

Helen

Newdick

Clean

Giles

Newington

Clean

Giles

Newington

THE LAST HURRAH

Cláir

Ní Aonghusa

Sunglasses

Stephanie

Norgate

Light Rising from Below

Sophie

Nussle

Art For Local People

Francis

O’Connor

Elizabeth’s Kitchen

Eileen

O’Donoghue

Magma

Mary

O’Shea

SNAP SNAP BABY

Kate

Oriol

the pin

G. L.

Osborne

Mutton Curry

Richard

Philip

Owl Jacket

Antonia

Phinnemore

Stroke

Laura

Post

Home

Ian

Priestley

Take Her Fishing

John

Pringle

Snow Bound

Clarrie

Pringle

LUNCH BREAK

Anne

Rabbitt

The Public Record

David

Rea

THE EULOGISTS

ALEX

REECE

Someone Steps In

Suzanne

Rivecca

ONE MORE CHANCE TO DANCE

Jean

Roarty

Whisht up a while will you!

John

Rodgers

Mrs Browning’s legacy

Peter

Rodgers

Whisht up a while will you!

John

Rodgers

Breaking News

Gregory

Rosenstock

War from the Words

David

Rubenstein

Gutless Living

Natalie

Rule

Cranberry Sauce

EC

Seaman

The Triumph of Renee Sorenson

Andrew

Shakespeare

A Watch For Christmas, Not For Life

Andrew

Shakespeare

A Light in the Green Woods

RAYMOND

SHEEHAN

Tracing the World

RAYMOND

SHEEHAN

Papillon

Jo

Sinclair

What You Don’t Know

Tracey

Slaughter

Storybook

Emma

Smith-Stevens

An Ounce of Truth

Penn

Spell

Ambush

Jo

Spencely

A Blue Silk Scarf

Meri

Spencer

U-156

Kate

Spitzmiller

Empty Nest

Malaika Rose

Stanley

Independence Day

Jenny

Steel

Last Sortie

PJ

Stephenson

MilkEyed Mender

Kerry

Swash

A Fair Bargain

Robert

Temple

Little Holocausts

Susan

Tepper

Crosshouse

Eleanor

Thom

Kissing a Goldfish

Eve

Turner

Fractions

Gabriel

Valjan

Becky and the Devil in an Act of Creative Destruction

Cady

Vishniac

JUST GIVING

Jennie

Walmsley

The Old graveyard

S D

West

Gabardine

david

wilkes

The Thrill of the Chase

Rick

Williams

Fair and Square

Alison

Withey

There is a spectre

Christopher

Young

 

 

 

 

 

Sunrise Sunset by Tina Pisco- REVIEW

March 16th, 2018 | Uncategorized | Comments Off on Sunrise Sunset by Tina Pisco- REVIEW

 

Let’s get the declaration of interest out of the way: I first encountered Tina Pisco at the 2008 West Cork Literary Festival where I heard her read a flash piece. It was knife-sharp; darkly incantatory. Some years later I recommended Pisco to Spolia – an online literary journal in the US. The story Spolia published (‘Erase And Rewind’) features in Sunrise Sunset. While guest-editing the ‘Fear & Fantasy’ issue of this journal, I read another story from the collection (‘The Strip’). I’m declaring this because I am name-checked in Sunrise Sunset’s acknowledgments – for which, thanks. But really, I had nothing to do with the making of these stories. They are all Pisco’s own.

And what a good thing that is.

Like Nuala O’Connor’s recent collection Joyride to Jupiter, one of the pleasures of Sunrise Sunset lies in its variety of both form and content. There are thirteen pieces here, including flash fiction, a graphic story, and a short novella which transposes ‘A Christmas Carol’ to contemporary urban America. The tone shifts too – from unapologetic fantastic-realism (‘Spell Work 101’) through gritty observation (the sublime ‘Declan’s Sister’) to witty borderline-polemic (‘A Carol’s Christmas’). There are stories which grapple with global realpolitik: forced migration, rape, fundamentalist warfare. There are creepy tales of the unexpected. There are coming-of-age narratives set in suburban and not-so-suburban homes. Yet for all its kaleidoscopery, the overall impression is one of coherence: this witch’s broth has been brewed by a singular, intelligent vision.

Coming away from Sunrise Sunset, I was left thinking about cycles: circadian, seasonal, menstrual, life, familial, economic, global – the rise and fall (and rise again) of worlds, inner and outer. This tidal swing and sway is reinforced by Pisco’s recurring motifs: seals, handsome men, lions, cats, birds, heat, the sea, blood, cars, sunrises, sunsets, even names – John and Carol/e. The swirling semantic rhythm reminded me of the great art of the Neolithic: its spirals carved on burial chamber walls, its ceramic figurines of women nursing baby lions. There is an underlying philosophy at work here: almost Buddhist, except it refuses to be named. And perhaps this is Pisco’s greatest strength as a writer – her ability to leave the important things unsaid.

Yet Pisco is never obscure. She understands story: not just the dynamics of each tale, but the art-fo

rm itself. Her narratives are full of hints that are seeded, followed-through and brought to satisfying dénouements. She is generous and upfront in referencing her sources: folklore, Dickens, Neil Gaiman (the black cat in Coraline, anyone?).There are oblique nods too to Angela Carter and Daphne du Maurier, particularly in the title story, and the building creepiness of ‘Erase And Rewind’ and the marvellous ‘The Strip’. This means, particularly in the more fantastical pieces, that we catch on very early to what Pisco is at and where the story is going.

This presents a risk, especially with the novella, where the transposition at first feels quite slight – okay, we get the joke, we know what’s coming, so why should we care? But Pisco understands that good transposition needs, sooner or later, to deviate from its source. The writer has to find a story and moral logic that both honours the original and carries the correct weight for the new context. As we delve into ‘A Carol’s Christmas’, we encounter tiny deviations from Dickens and it’s these that make the story most satisfying. We realise that Carol is both Scrooge and the over-extended, bullied Bob Cratchett; this blurring, like print off-set, puts both the original and the new into sharper focus. Pisco also grapples successfully with the time-bomb Dickens left for any adapter – sentimentality. She doesn’t shy away from pulling heartstrings: I, like Carol, had a tear in my eye at her vision of Christmas Future. But Pisco’s Ghost is too sardonic, too wise, too knowing – too modern – to let anyone’s tears flow for long.

Similarly in ‘The Strip’, though we can guess where narrator Ellen is heading, the reveal is written in language so distilled it almost takes the breath away: ‘Ellen knows everything: what the Universe is made of, how time can run backwards, where all the dead souls go, why some choose to stay.’ The pay-off is no

t epistemophilic, the rush of disclosure. It is poetic; to fully get what Ellen sees in that moment, we have to exercise sympathetic magic – put ourselves in her place and imagine.

Pisco’s prose is assured throughout: never showy yet full of startling images. A woman sits on a bayside deck, illuminated not by moonlight but the glow of her tablet. A ghost prowls through an edit suite, smartphones cables leaking from her rotting corporate suit. The voices of the many narrators are distinct and embodied: smooth, seductive, misleading, self-recriminatory. Every great sentence – and there are many – has the simple, casual, muscular grace of a lioness flicking out her paw to bat at prey.

The range is exhilarating. It’s refreshing to read magical realism that doesn’t make apologies for itself, a mature female voice that’s not pretending to be anything else. At times, the collection feels almost like a guide for living as woman in this complex, compromised world. ‘My body! My choice!’ screams teenage Ruby alone in the woods, terrified by the prospect of how her vegetarian feminist lesbian mother will respond to her first period. What a clever choice, to put a marching slogan into this most personal of places.

Some pieces, however, did leave me wanting. While ‘Four Flashes from the Frontlines’ is taut and convincing, deft in its handling of contrasts, ‘Moon Angel’, which tackles related subject matter, feels less sure – particularly in the chosen point of view and the level of detail around the narrator. Is this a story that could be taken further, I wondered; or was I meant to read it as an exercise in disconnect? ‘Declan’s Sister’ – though a beautiful piece in its own right, redolent of Colin Barrett in its depiction of small-town anomie – made me long for Pisco to write a full-on novel about the young, set in a grotty, post-rece

Because, for all the delights of the fantastical pieces, it is when Pisco turns her attention to the ordinary that this collection slices most profoundly. Her innately magical sensibility blends with realism to create moments that linger, meanings that percolate through the mind once the reading is over. Ruby tying her top around her waist to hide her new blood. Carol/Scrooge hauling wet sheets out of a washing-machine. Rob describing Declan’s desperate Sister as an ‘angel’, in a town where sink estates have ‘mushroomed like fairy rings’. The Strip’s sad raver, Buddha-Boy, smiling to himself as he listens to music only he can hear. And, compellingly, the powerless narrator in ‘Imagine This/Imagine That’, who, in her tiny last line, creates that most magical of storytelling illusions: trifurcating her identity so she is simultaneously herself, the reader, and the author. Leaving us with a reproach which is also a wish, an impossibility which is also a call to arms. That’s a spiral worth engraving on the walls of any burial chamber.


Fish launched this collection of short stories, flash and comic-strip fiction from West Cork author Tina Pisco at the West Cork Literary Festival in July 2016 

Surreal, sad, zany, funny, Tina Pisco’s stories are drawn from gritty realism as much as the swirling clouds of the imagination. An astute, empathetic and sometimes savage observer, she brings her characters to life as they dance from the pages into your mind where they linger long after the book is put down.

Sunrise Sunset is an Aladdin’s Cave of gems that offers the perfect blend of magic surrealism and gritty realism. –                                                                                                                             Conal Creedon

I loved ‘Ruby and the Red Tent.’ Long live all the denizens of the red tent, and those on the outside too.                                                                                                                                                David Mitchell

Buy now

The launch was in Ma Murphy’s pub in Bantry. Tina read to a packed house and Mary Morrissey launched the book. Afterwards it descended into a full-blown session of music and song, with musicians, both local and blown-in, from Jack Lukeman’s Songwriting Workshop at the Festival. Jack led the singing and it all went superbly until we were kicked out well beyond closing time.

Chief Editor at Fish Wins Bridport Poetry Prize

November 23rd, 2017 | Uncategorized | Comments Off on Chief Editor at Fish Wins Bridport Poetry Prize

Mary-Jane Holmes Wins Bridport Poetry Prize

Mary-Jane Holmes, chief editor at Fish has added the prestigious Bridport Prize for Poetry to her gathering tally of prizes. Read more. Competition Judge Lemn Sissy wrote – 

“The winning poem is ‘Siren Call’.  I am drawn to a bleak coastal town. I am drawn by sound. It is like a short film.  Unsentimental.  Brutal even.  The writer draws us to sound from the outset.   I am lured into listening. Through aural sensation the picture unfolds.   It has all the detail of La Cite Des Enfants Perdus.  Listen as the writer instructs “no not the familiar sounds”.  The writer shakes the reader from complacency and into a Sirens Call.  There’s a confidence of line. I am hypnotized  by The Siren Call.” 

Mary-Jane teaches the Fish Short Story Writing Course online, and works as an editor for poetry, the novel, memoir, and flash fiction along with short story. She will be teaching a week-long poetry workshop in July 2018 at Casa Ana in Spain, where she is joint director of the Casa Ana Writing Programme.

Fish Anthology 2017 – LAUNCH

July 8th, 2017 | Uncategorized | Comments Off on Fish Anthology 2017 – LAUNCH

Fish Anthology 2017The West Cork Literary Festival celebrates its 20th anniversary this year. Clem Cairns of Fish Publishing started and grew the festival into one of Ireland’s biggest literary events.

The Fish Anthology launch has been a major event at the Festival since its inception in 1997. This year, Mia Gallagher, author and Fish winner (2005) will be launching the anthology.

Twenty-one of the forty authors will be attending the event and reading from their work. 

 

All are welcome 

17th July @ 6.00pm

The Maritime Hotel, Bantry, Co Cork

 

Poetry Results 2017

May 23rd, 2017 | Uncategorized | Comments Off on Poetry Results 2017

We are pleased to announce the winners plus short and long lists for the 2017 Fish Poetry Contest, and would like to congratulate the poets for being selected from a pool of 1,305. 

Ten Winning Poems (chosen by Jo Shapcott) to be published in 2017 Fish Anthology

Short List

Long List


 

Judge Jo Shapcott has chosen the following ten poems for inclusion in the Fish Anthology, which will be launched at the West Cork Literary Festival on Monday 17th July. Our thanks to Jo Shapcott for taking on the task, and for the comments on the winning poems. And congratulations to the ten poets who have been selected.

There were 1,305 entries to the contest.

We apologise for the delay in announcing these results. 

Unusually, two of the winning poets each have two poems in the final ten. Róisín Kelly is the overall winner with Paris, 13 November 2015, and Tuam received an Honorary Mention but has been withdrawn du to publication elsewhere. Vincent Roderic poems Yesterday Clouds and Throw Me Down The Key came 2nd and 3rd respectively. We have decided to include two further poets in the Anthology so as to publish ten poets rather than eight. The two poets, are Harriet David and Catherine Ormell (listed below).

 

Róisín Kelly

First:
Paris, 13 November 2015 by Róisín Kelly (Ireland)
Love and violence collide in this poem.  The way the writer interleaves terror and passion makes for a remarkable, tender and terrifying work.

Second:
Yesterday Clouds by Roderic Vincent (UK)Vincent Roderic
This exploration of the ‘secret blather’ of lovers delves into language, memory and loss so powerfully that the poem became, ironically, one I couldn’t forget.

Third:
Throw Me Down The Key by Roderic Vincent (UK)
A poised and beautifully observed elegiac poem, which hinges on the central image of the familiar apartment window key drop, allowing gravity to resonate and tremble in the reader’s ear and eye.

 

Honorary Mentions: (in no particular order)

Peter SirrAdd to Dictionary by Peter Sirr (Ireland)
The poem asks for no less than a new language, a new dictionary for the shattered and broken world which has been delivered by humanity to humanity. 

A Short Exposure by Anthony Lawrence (Australia)
Anthony LawrenceA powerful sense of time and place imbue gives elegiac and cinematic force to the poem, so that central character becomes known and unforgettable.

Forty Winters by Harry Bauld
A beautifully turned sonnet which delivers a vision of ageing which is both poignant and good-humoured.  Its taut, sinewy language and syntax work with the form to give the poem a natural and uniquely self-elegiac air.

Heron by Judith Taylor
The heron is so beautifully observed and described here, that in our flawed human way we want to reach into the poem and touch it while responding, at the same time, to the poem’s suggestive reflection on the particular indifference and power of the natural world.

Preface to an Autoimmune Response by Aídah Gil (USA)Aídah Gil
A poem of the body and in the body which delivers a convincing and, at times, frightening vision of internal and external physical worlds colliding.

Tuam by Róisín Kelly
Close, accurate and steady observation give this poem’s historical and political context even more impact; and the movement between Cambodia and Ireland adds to its power.
NOTE: This poem has been withdrawn due to publication elsewhere and Jo Shapcott’s 11th choice The Station Fire by Harriet David (UK) replaces it. 

Truthfully by Suzanne Cleary (USA) Suzanne Cleary
Long, vivid lines and sentences unfurl into the past with the poem finding a route via a resonant object (a dress) into a remembered vital moment where, as the poet says, desire and fear of truth reside.  Past and present are beautifully interwoven and this resonant material is well handled in the poem.

 

 

The Station Fire by Harriet David (UK)Harriet David

 

 

 

The Catch by Catherine Ormell (UK)Catherine Ormell-

 

 


 

 

Short List, Poetry 2017 (64 poems)

Sunflower Encolpion

Mara

Adamitz Scrupe

 

in the dens of the fires
swept clean

Mara

Adamitz Scrupe

 

Lone Swallow

David

Allies

 

The Spindle Tree

Gabriella

Attems

Going and Coming Back

Judith

Barrington

 

Attempt

Harry

Bauld

 

Forty Winters

Harry

Bauld

 

One Twenty-Nine A. M.

Harry

Bauld

 

The Binding

Eric

Berlin

 

Upon Mistaking “pressure” for “pleasure”
in a Poem by Anne Carson

Partridge

Boswell

 

Murder

Sue

Butler

 

The Rare Case of a Good Day
for the Both of Us

Molly

Carpenter

 

The Visit

Bev

Clark

 

Truthfully

Suzanne

Cleary

 

Self Portrait as a Mermaid

c m

coates

BROOCH

A.M.

Cousins

 

Bringing Home the Cows

Bernie

Crawford

 

The Station Fire

H

David

Bombs Don’t Fall

Scott

Elder

 

How to Create a Seascape

Marian

Fielding

 

onebigloudthing

Dean

Gessie

 

Preface to an Autoimmune
Response

Aidah

Gil

Love is Dead

Aileen

Gorman

 

Evidence

Matt

Hohner

 

Reverse Bachata

Matt

Hohner

 

A Technology for Remembering

Cynthia

Hughes

 

Sea Thrift

Majella

Kelly

 

Tuam

Roisin

Kelly

 

Paris, 13 November 2015

Roisin

Kelly

Skunk Cabbage

Jay

Kidd

 

Lover’s Leap

Zach

Knox

 

A Short Exposure

Antiony

Lawrence

 

Sic Transit Sutra

Robert

Lumsden

Fly-by-night

Emer

Lyons

 

Convent Kitchen

Wende

McCabe

 

Umbilical

Ian

McEwen

News of Another Star

Mary

Melvin Geoghegan

 

Passion Prayer

Tricia

Monk

A Wake in April

Catherine

Morris

 

Sunday, St. Finian’s Bay

Cris

Mulvey

Beast-Music

Jed

Myers

 

Some Thorns

Jed

Myers

 

Tarkwa Bay

Catherine

Nicolson

 

The Topiary of Passendale

Christopher

North

 

The Catch

catherine

ormell

Sunday Mass at the Church
Avenue Bar and Grill

Phyllis

Reilly

 

Finding a simile for resilience

Sarah

Rice

 

Home Sweet Home

Susan

Richardson

 

A light

Howard

Robertson

 

Orchard

Gorky

Servicer

 

Despair is a rude thing

Araks

Shahinyan

 

Layers

Raymond

Sheehan

 

The Hospital

Laura

Shore

Nature and Nurture

Jac

Shortland

 

Add to Dictionary

Peter

Sirr

 

Old Pier at Midnight

Carla 

Hunter Southwick

 

We refugees

Michael

Swan

Cold front

Judith

Taylor

 

Yesterday Clouds

Roderic

Vincent

 

Throw Me Down The Key

Roderic

Vincent

“Almost Milestones”

Wes

Ward

 

Torched

Diana

Whitney

 

Cat’s Cradle

Grace

Wilentz

 

Godrevy Head : June 2015

Steve

Xerri

 

 


 

 

Long List, Poetry Prize 2017 (196 poems)

Sunflower Encolpion

Mara

Adamitz Scrupe

 

in the dens of the fires
swept clean

Mara

Adamitz Scrupe

 

Lone Swallow

David

Allies

 

In the Orchard

Gabriella

Attems

On the Archduke’s Estate

Gabriella

Attems

The Spindle Tree

Gabriella

Attems

Another Compass Smuggled
Across The Mediterranean Sea

Michael

Baradi

Making Hay With My Father

Robert

Barrett

Going and Coming Back

Judith

Barrington

 

First Death

Myra

Barrs

Night Piece

Myra

Barrs

Attempt

Harry

Bauld

 

Fifth grade

Harry

Bauld

Forty Winters

Harry

Bauld

 

One Twenty-Nine A. M.

Harry

Bauld

 

The Binding

Eric

Berlin

 

He’s gone

Paula

Blengino

Blood, Metal, Fiber, Rock

Elizabeth

Bodien

England

Leonardo

Boix

Upon Mistaking “pressure”
for “pleasure” in a Poem by
Anne Carson

Partridge

Boswell

 

Gozo

Alice

Bowen

Augury

Susan

Browne

Ground

Frances

Browne

Waiting Room

Frances

Browne

Dorothy

Dan

Buckley

Gothic

Sue

Burge

It is there

Edel

Burke

Observance

Edel

Burke

Murder

Sue

Butler

 

Ars Poetica, How to
Wear a Scarf

Elizabeth

Buttimer

Charlene and Me

Courtney

Camden

The Rare Case of a Good
Day for the Both of Us

Molly

Carpenter

 

Boxes: Depression Poems

Caira

Clark

The Visit

Bev

Clark

 

Truthfully

Suzanne

Cleary

 

Self Portrait as a Mermaid

c m

coates

Mayan Queen

Jo

Colley

Aleppo

jacqui

corcoran

Salmon

jacqui

corcoran

ALARM

A.M.

Cousins

BROOCH

A.M.

Cousins

 

Bringing Home the Cows

Bernie

Crawford

 

Clipped Life

Bernie

Crawford

Three Ways to Live as a
Suburban Corvid

Carmel

Daly

Morning Prayer

Suzannah

Dalzell

Eyesore

H

David

The Station Fire

H

David

Landscape Woman

Royston

Dawber

between meals

Terry

Dawson

The Water Table

Claire

Delahunty

Am I?

Elaine

Desmond

Collecting Urine

bryony

doran

Excision

Hugh

Dunkerley

Losing it in the
Natural History Museum

Hugh

Dunkerley

Nineveh

Tyler

Dunston

Bombs Don’t Fall

Scott

Elder

 

Return from St.André

Scott

Elder

Accident and Emergency

Emer

Fallon

Pearls

Emer

Fallon

The Fish

Orla

Fay

Word Skin

Orla

Fay

Reprographic Orders

Rachel

Fenton

How to Create a Seascape

Marian

Fielding

 

Diss/belief

Nikki

Fine

onebigloudthing

Dean

Gessie

 

Preface to an Autoimmune
Response

Aidah

Gil

Epitaph at the End of a
Beach Walk

Ellen

Girardeau

Wake Dance

Ellen

Girardeau

Soundtrack Rachmaninov

Helena

Goddard

Closing the Porch

Connie

Golden

Love is Dead

Aileen

Gorman

 

Camouflage

Ian

Gouge

Infection

Izabella

Grace

The Scollays, Sandquoy and
the Tank at the Back

Lydia

Harris

The Island

Jacqueline P.

Haskell

June

Isaac

Hellemn

Evidence

Matt

Hohner

 

Reverse Bachata

Matt

Hohner

 

Twenty kilohertz

Laragh Sheridan

Horn

A Technology for
Remembering

Cynthia

Hughes

 

The Time White Lightning
Busted Out

Cynthia

Hughes

Old Pier at Midnight

Carla

Hunter Southwick

 

“We Made a Garden”

Garrett

Igoe

Final Project Presented In
Form of Sculpture

Emma

Johnson-Rivard

Spring Canticle

Andrea

Johnston

Visitors

Des

Kavanagh

Patronymics

Seamas

Keenan

Blue

Majella

Kelly

Paris, 13 November 2015

Roisin

Kelly

Sea Thrift

Majella

Kelly

 

Sign Of The Cross

Majella

Kelly

Terribly Beautiful

John D.

Kelly

Tuam

Roisin

Kelly

 

The Day after the Morning
My Sister Didn’t Wake Up

Gunilla

Kester

Skunk Cabbage

Jay

Kidd

 

Close by Blood and
Neighborhood

Dicko

King

Lover’s Leap

Zach

Knox

 

A Short Exposure

Antiony

Lawrence

Memory

Antiony

Lawrence

The Mountain

Antiony

Lawrence

Crack of Dawn

Stuart

Lee

Dragon Pearl Tea

Stuart

Lee

Hooked

charles

levy

Cattails in Autumn

V. P.

Loggins

Sic Transit Sutra

Robert

Lumsden

Stone Shore

Terry

Lynch

The Plane

Mona

Lynch

Timing.

Fiona

Lynch

Fly-by-night

Emer

Lyons

 

Me, My M(inor) S(etback) & I

Pamela

Martin

Sorry

Charlotte

Martinkus

Convent Kitchen

Wende

McCabe

 

Readiness

Wende

McCabe

Gap

katharine

mcdermott

Shrine

Ian

McEwen

Umbilical

Ian

McEwen

After a Dream

Ruth

McIlroy

From de la Causa

Ruth

McIlroy

November, the Realist

James

McKee

Why Poems of Love Too
Often Rhyme

James

McKenna

News of Another Star

Mary

Melvin Geoghegan

 

FIX

joan

michelson

In a Municipality of Spain

Lauren

Miller

Passion Prayer

Tricia

Monk

A Wake in April

Catherine

Morris

Last Cuppa

Cris

Mulvey

Sunday, St. Finian’s Bay

Cris

Mulvey

Beast-Music

Jed

Myers

 

Fallen One

Jed

Myers

Her Own Company

Jed

Myers

Oxytocin

Jed

Myers

Shade in the Chapel

Jed

Myers

Some Thorns

Jed

Myers

 

Tarkwa Bay

Catherine

Nicolson

 

House

Christopher

North

The Smudge of Andromeda

Christopher

North

The Topiary of Passendale

Christopher

North

 

A Teenage Boy in a Town
Called Descartes

Maria

O’Brien

Aingeal

Eileen

O’Connor

Early Sleep

C.P.

O’Donnell

My Version of Events

James

O’Leary

The Catch

catherine

ormell

The Green Man’s Lament

Romola

Parish

Dear Father

Marie

Parkins

How To Comfort The Dying

Jill

Penny

Shiritori

Viola

Prinz

Gladiolus

Shahar

Raveh

Ice and Recession

Philip

Rees

Girl Poem

Dan

Reid

Sunday Mass at the Church
Avenue Bar and Grill

Phyllis

Reilly

 

Adder Control

Sarah

Rice

Finding a simile for resilience

Sarah

Rice

 

Weekly Treatment

Sarah

Rice

Home Sweet Home

Susan

Richardson

 

Feur Gorm

Fiona

Rintoul

A light

Howard

Robertson

 

Creative Design

Vince

Rockston

The easy way

Robyn

Rowland

Second Valley

Barry

Ryan

all are not thieves that dogs
bark at

Martha

Schut

Orchard

Gorky

Servicer

 

The World is Full of Lost and
Broken Things

Amanda

Sewell

Despair is a rude thing

Araks

Shahinyan

 

Layers

Raymond

Sheehan

 

A Love Deferred – After
Langston Hughes

Hannah

Shepard

A Bargain

Laura

Shore

Avalon Park Elementary

Laura

Shore

Poof

Laura

Shore

The Hospital

Laura

Shore

Nature and Nurture

Jac

Shortland

 

Ephemeral Architecture

Rebecca

Simpson

Add to Dictionary

Peter

Sirr

 

Keeping On

Eilis

Stanley

Estuary

Geraldine

Stoneham

Smoke

Geraldine

Stoneham

dis-pensation

Nelson

Surry

We refugees

Michael

Swan

Cold front

Judith

Taylor

 

Heron

Judith

Taylor

The Sundial of
Dissonance

Ruth

Timmins

Primroses

Jean

Tuomey

On These The Days: The
Magnificent Glory of Being

Rebecca

Van Horn

Helium And Anchor

Shubha

Venugopal

Sestina

Roderic

Vincent

Throw Me Down The Key

Roderic

Vincent

Yesterday Clouds

Roderic

Vincent

 

Sick Woman Theory

Cady

Vishniac

Like Churchill’s Bombers

Martin

Wakefield

The Hours Alone

rob

wallis

“Almost Milestones”

Wes

Ward

 

Earthquake

Julie

Watts

How My Mother
Made Porridge

Julie

Watts

1989,2000

Emily

Wexler

Ominously & Brillantly,
Questionlessly Happy

Mary Jane

White

Torched

Diana

Whitney

 

Cat’s Cradle

Grace

Wilentz

 

Matryoshka

Grace

Wilentz

Knowing spoons

Sophia

Wimberley

Godrevy Head : June 2015

Steve

Xerri

 

Scars

Karen

Zelas

 

 

Flash Fiction: Results, 2017

April 12th, 2017 | Uncategorized | Comments Off on Flash Fiction: Results, 2017

We apologise for the delay in announcing results. Look to see if your flash story is on the short or long list.

Short List

Long List

Congratulations to the writers who made it onto the short and long lists and in particular to the final 10. There were 946 entries to the competition.

The ten winners, chosen by judge Chris Stewart for inclusion in the 2017 Fish Anthology, are listed below. Chris’s comments on the first, second and third placed stories are included.

We will add biographical details of the writers in the next few days.

 

FIRST:

LOST by Lindsay Fisher.

“This is a really excellent piece. It’s unpretentiously crafted by somebody who really knows their stuff, the craft and technique taking a back seat but the whole being informed by a calm and warm hearted confidence. What stands out for me is the writer’s kindness and understanding, her (I’d put my shirt on it being a woman) warmth and fellow feeling. She is the sort of person who really ought to be writing, and winning prizes and getting published and selling heaps of books, because a piece like this pushes all the right buttons: it informs, entertains, and makes a better person of the reader, at least insofar as this can be achieved. You read a piece like this and you instantly resolve never to be a black-browed man with shoo-away hands waving, because the piece has enriched your understanding, reminded you, of the reasons why people are as they are. It’s a wise piece, an antidote to the thoughtless, graceless, arrogant and simplistic trumpery that is the hallmark of the world of 2017. It does not sink into sentimentality; it has a high quality mathematical construction, like music. As for the bad stuff… well, given the high level of competence of this writer…  I wouldn’t have the temerity.”

 

SECOND:

LUNA by Peter Jordan

“A writer who knows how to do it with unsophisticated simplicity, and neither word in the pejorative sense. That’s the power of the piece: it’s a great story, skilfully and artfully told, and leaving one full of wonderment and curiosity, determined to delve a little deeper. What know we of orcas and their trainers? Well nothing really, but this piece takes us down deep and gives us a tantalising glimpse of another world, privileged information. Those short, clipped and finely honed sentences are just right for the job. The piece is beautiful in its strangeness, in its suggestion of a world in which men give up their all for love of a creature from another species.”

 

THIRD:

DRIFTING by Emma Whitehall

“I really loved this skilfully woven fantasy. I wondered if the man who wrote it had really married a mermaid – or if she be a woman – whether she were one. That’s how much it convinced me. There are people like this, fish-people who are happier in the water. Me I swim like brick but I take great delight in this craftsmanlike and moving portrayal of a strange and rare condition. It takes me somewhere I never dreamed of going, and I love to be led there by somebody who knows the craft and carries me so boldly. I couldn’t have done it better myself… and I certainly wouldn’t have the temerity to attempt it.”

 

HONORARY MENTIONS:

Ball by Andrew Peters

Slapped Down by Isobel Hourigan

Search for Your Son by Shubha Venugopal

Scrabble by Helen Bralesford

Escape Velocity by Christina Eagles

Seashells by Laz Geiger

The Circle of Oaks by Tony Curtis

 

Short List

46 stories selected out of 946 entries

Title

First Name

Last Name

Trapped

Larry

Allen

Glencoe

C. E.

Ayr

Junction

Edwina

Bowen

Scrabble

Helen

Bralesford

Secrets

Lorna

Cooper

The Circle of Oaks

Tony

Curtis

Gomey

Kathy

D’Arcy

Bowing to the Moon

Christina

Eagles

Escape Velocity

Christina

Eagles

Dead Cat

Christina

Eagles

First meeting with SF, 1922

Paul

Evans

What Daniil Kharms Believes

Katie

Farris

The Lie That Changed The World

Will

Fish

Lost

Lindsay

Fisher

Mam’s Got Worries

Lindsay

Fisher

Today I Will Wear Blue Cotton

Lindsay

Fisher

Seashells

Laz

Geiger

Macchu Picchu

Al

Gowan

Backfire

Des

Hannigan

Bus Shelter

Alison

Healy

Renewal

Russell

Helms

Chance Meeting at Lucky Dog Stand

Richard

Holeton

Language Class

Conor

Houghton

Slapped Down

Isobel

Hourican

Luna

Peter

Jordan

The Butcher

Antiony

Lawrence

Nothing Happened to Me Today

Catherine

Le Fleur

End Game

Nancy

Ludmerer

Shaping

Lesley

Mace

Her Mother’s House

Kyle

McCarty

The Thin Ledge

Mark

McGlynn

Voting’s Open Now

Diane

McMillan

No Skin

Janine

Mikosza

Dad Set Fire to a Field

Steven

Moss

Oxytocin

mary

omnes

Ball

Andrew

Peters

Keep Smiling

Denise

Roche

A Tongue Lashing

Peter

Rogers

LINDA’S BOY

Elizabeth

Rose

The Internet Can be Dangerous

Bev

Smith

Love Story

Sally

St. Clair

God Regrets

Sally

St. Clair

Sharing

Sherri

Turner

After-taste

Rose

van Son

Search for Your Son

Shubha

Venugopal

Drifting

Emma

Whitehall

 

 

Long List

143 stories selected out of 946 entries

Title

First Name

Last Name

   

Some Far-off Thing

Christopher

Allen

Trapped

Larry

Allen

Glencoe

C. E.

Ayr

Talk to me

Karen

Ballard

Trinity Steele

Sheila

Banning

Daymare

Peter

Beard

Being Helpful

Lucille

Bellucci

Important Date for Mum’s Diary

Sharon

Bennett

Babytron

Mathias

Bernbom Andersen

Collecting Stamps

Paul

Blewitt

The Child’s Cry

Edwina

Bowen

Junction

Edwina

Bowen

Scrabble

Helen

Bralesford

Curlews, Outer Hebrides

Pamela

Bridgeman

Sexpresso Anyone?

Anthony

Bynom

Credence

Bebe

Byrne-O’Shea

Haunted House

Helen

Caldwell

Mind Your Own Business

Helen

Caldwell

This Love Thing

Caroline

Carter

Angel of Death

Paul

Chiswick

That Which Lingers

Erin

Cockreham

In Bloom

Lorna

Cooper

Secrets

Lorna

Cooper

Birds of a Feather

Susan

Cornford

The Circle of Oaks

Tony

Curtis

Gomey

Kathy

D’Arcy

The Sacrifice

H

David

How to Get Over Her (Some Suggestions)

Ben

Dooley

By The Bed

Penelope

Duffy

Bowing to the Moon

Christina

Eagles

Escape Velocity

Christina

Eagles

Dead Cat

Christina

Eagles

First meeting with SF, 1922

Paul

Evans

What Daniil Kharms Believes

Katie

Farris

The Drought

Tracy

Faulkner

Skin

Amy

Finlayson

The Lie That Changed The World

Will

Fish

Lost

Lindsay

Fisher

Mam’s Got Worries

Lindsay

Fisher

Today I Will Wear Blue Cotton

Lindsay

Fisher

Lightbulb Moments

Linda

Foster

The Trouble with Bouncing Back

Lisa

Fransson

Seashells

Laz

Geiger

The Hospital Walk-In

Rodge

Glass

King of the Castle

Marie

Gordon

Macchu Picchu

Al

Gowan

Trigger

Yael

Hacohen

Field of Gold

Des

Hannigan

Backfire

Des

Hannigan

Bottle

Gina

Headden

Bus Shelter

Alison

Healy

Mulligan

Tim

Heintzman

Renewal

Russell

Helms

Roy

Brian

Heston

Chance Meeting at Lucky Dog Stand

Richard

Holeton

I WAITED

Sheila

Hooks

Language Class

Conor

Houghton

Slapped down

Isobel

Hourigan

Day 1 Tehachapi State Prison

Scott

Isaly

LIMBO

Gideon

Jacobs

Toccata and Fugue in D Minor

Ingrid

Jendrzejewski

Cooking with Gas

Marian

Jennings

Luna

Peter

Jordan

Converse

Ayal

Kushner

The Butcher

Antiony

Lawrence

Nothing Happened to Me Today

Catherine

Le Fleur

Afterwards

Amanda

Leahy

Confabulation

Kevin

Leahy

MEET ME IN BELFAST

Trish

Leake

Never Noticed

K. Kris

Loomis

End Game

Nancy

Ludmerer

Shaping

Lesley

Mace

Crocodiles

Andre

Mangeot

Seeing Red

Louise

Mangos

The Dip Between Dunes

Melissa

Manning

Taking The Piss

Vincent

Marmion

Just Daughter

Kyle

McCarty

Her Mother’s House

Kyle

McCarty

A Tale About Daughters

Sarah

McClung

Three Tales About Boiled Eggs

Sarah

McClung

A GRAN’S BEST FRIEND

Christian

McCulloch

The Thin Ledge

Mark

McGlynn

Decisions

Brooke

McKinney

Voting’s Open Now

Diane

McMillan

The Last Temptation

Kwame MA

McPherson

No Skin

Janine

Mikosza

Coral

Tamara

Miles

I MET THE 45th PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES FOR DRINKS

Grant

Miller

MY WIFE AND I HAD THE 45th PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OVER FOR DINNER

Grant

Miller

Be Careful What You Pray For

Ken

Moore

Enlisting

Chris

Morris

If the Shoes Fit

Sherry

Morris

Summer Wheat

Linda

Moser

Dad Set Fire to a Field

Steven

Moss

Where do babies come from?

J

Mulligan

An Ribín Buí (The Yellow Ribbon)

David

Murray

Pop

Anna

Nazarova

Puzzling, Innit?

EIVIND

NERBERG

Adult Decisions

Courtney

Nigh

The ride

Jonathan

O’Brien

Oxytocin

mary

omnes

Love

Ofir

Oz

Ball

Andrew

Peters

Road Kill

Russell

Reader

WALK BRISKLY

ALEX

REECE

Keep Smiling

Denise

Roche

A Tongue Lashing

Peter

Rogers

LINDA’S BOY

Elizabeth

Rose

Fetch

Mike

Russell

Into Thin Air

Janet E.

Sahafi

The Exchange

Rachel

Sargeant

Encounter in Nice

Lars Ole

Sauerberg

Something Shattered

Dana

Schmidt

The bear that ruined the wedding

Hannah

Smith

The Internet Can be Dangerous

Bev

Smith

Love Story

Sally

St. Clair

God Regrets

Sally

St. Clair

Thanks, Really

Kathy

Stevens

On Their Last Glass Legs

Ruth

Tamiatto

Genocide

Margot

Tesch

Undercurrent

Laurie

Theurer

JUNGLE CHAT

Mick

thewriter

How to Be The Baby

Lauren

Triola

Never Too Late

Jennie

Tucker

Sharing

Sherri

Turner

After-taste

Rose

van Son

Search for Your Son

Shubha

Venugopal

Levuka Blues

Roger

Vickery

Scorched Earth

Gillian

Walker

The First Time

Kristin

Walrod

A plane falls from the sky

Lindsay

Walter

The Spy

Ren

Watson

A Night Out with the Bootle Ordnance Survey

Colin

Watts

Till Death Do Us Part

Tracey

Weddle

Drifting

Emma

Whitehall

Hunger

Laura

Wiley

Regrets

Alison

Williams

Absence

Michelle

Wright

A Knowing Woman’s Pearls

Maja

Zmyslowski

 

 

Memoirs: Results 2017

April 1st, 2017 | Uncategorized | Comments Off on Memoirs: Results 2017

We are delighted to announce the winners of the 2017 Fish Short Memoir Contest, as chosen by judge Vanessa Gebbie.

The 10 short memoirs will be published in the 2017 Fish Anthology.

Vanessa’s comments on the memoirs are with each one, and her overall notes on the judging are below, followed by biographical information on each of the authors.

There were 784 entries to the contest.

First Prize: (€1,000)

Pay Attention by Paul McGranaghan (Dublin)

“ This was my ‘stand-out’ piece among a strong field. Beautifully written, intimate and atmospheric, a second person unfolding that draws the reader right in with exhortations to ‘come and see’, to ‘look’, watch’, as the writer describes in gorgeous, often disturbing prose, their childhood experiences of The Troubles. 

            …our house feels as though it has been lifted a few centimeters off the ground and dropped. All the radiators chime like tuning forks. We awake only to return to sleep.

         Listen to what my mother tells us: “It’s only a bomb”.

The refrain phrases ‘come and see’, ‘look’ and ‘watch’ are not only hugely successful stylistically, drawing me in to be a bystander in the episodes described, but are an echo of the school reader books of the time.  They are a constant gentle reminder that these events are being recalled from childhood, that the things a child sees and remembers may differ from those of an adult. 

Characters from the memories step into the spotlight and live again, opening up into wonderfully observed descriptions of place:

 My grandmother takes snuff, swears and removes her false teeth in public. She eats so many cinnamon Imperials that she smells of cinnamon and she swigs her tea from an old glass tankard.
This is where she lives: Her terraced house overlooks the park. To one side of the park is an orchard that runs behind the Victorian parochial house, which in turn sits behind the great stone snail of the Sacred Heart Church.

Disturbing events are related with a directness and simplicity which throws their horror into stark relief:

I remember the pylons with electricity singing in their ears, the whole world lush, green and cold, and a naked boy. His hands cover his crotch. His howling mouth is a red circle and his eyes are screwed up into crow’s-feet. He crosses the field towards us. He is as pale as candle wax.

I could go on and on, pulling out examples, to show you why I loved this piece. I haven’t yet said how beautiful some of the scenes are. So read it. Look. Go and see. And join me in congratulating this writer, whoever it be.”  

 

Second Prize: (A week at Casa Ana Writers Retreat & €300)

The Master by Tom Finnigan (Donegal)

“The shortest of all the shortlist, and a terrific piece – The Master is the tale of a failed student priest who becomes a lorry driver in his father’s demolition firm. 

The glimmering wetness of pot-holes brimming after rain and the roar of the crane conspired to make me think I was Dante being led by Virgil into Hell. I was led instead to a squat tipper truck. Behind the windscreen, a Daily Mirror twitched and a cap bobbed. Maurice banged on the driver’s door.

     “Get out of that, you dirty auld Mayo whore and show a bit of respect.”

And here, the teacher is introduced – the wonderful Paddy Walshe – once met, never forgotten! In The Master, the day to day roughhousing and toughness of this new occupation are brilliantly juxtaposed with memories of the gentler experiences of the student priest, adding a touch of wry comedy to the whole:

             Palms used to smooth metaphysical texts bled with splinters – my Manchester stigmata.

I loved the thoughtfulness of this piece, and especially the concluding thought – that acts of love are found in unexpected places, and everywhere.”

 

Third Prize:

Sand on the Mountain by Mary Griese (Somerset, UK)

“A very atmospheric, beautifully written account of a young family buying a Welsh hill farm, something from another era, and the neighbours – everything superbly evoked, drawing me in, bringing a lost generation into striking view. The characters in this piece are marvellously alive – this piece was much enjoyed.”

 

Honorary Mentions:

Dear Eilis by Therese Ryan. (Sligo)

“A direct and poignant letter to a birth mother, ‘Dear  Eilis’ charts unflinchingly and with increasing quiet desperation the dance between the mother who is unwilling to tell her family about her extra child, and the child she gave away. Sensitively done, it is so easy to fall into sentimentality with this subject (I am an adopted adult myself) –  but this writer is completely in control and the journey is very compelling.”

 

Sound of Stone by Chris Mulvey (California)

This impressive piece with its marvellous visceral detail never dips into sentimentality, rather sets out a compelling series of episodes which unfold with enormous care and control.

Baggage by Martin Cromie (N. Ireland)

“A very nicely done account of an elderly mother decluttering, and her son catching the bug himself when he is diagnosed with suspected cancer. The characters bounce off the page – I enjoyed the patterns in this piece, the movement, and the terrific writing.”

 

What Remains by Barbara Fried (California)

“I thought this exploration of a few moments in a much loved parent’s decline into dementia was great – this subject, I suspect, is a well trodden one – but this piece is set out as just a conversation, very simple, indeed deceptively simple. The father’s personality glimmers in and out of focus as the exchanges repeat and return, and I found myself thinking how effective this was – a successful example of ‘less is more’.”

 

Elbow Grease by John Killeen (Carlow)

I did love the voice in this piece, the pace which bounced along in a refreshing way, and the marvellous humour bouncing between the characters in both dialogue and action. 

 

New York 1981 by Aneko Campbell (UK)

From cockroaches to beggars, creepy pick-ups, drugs  and bigotry, a patronising top author – a perfect anti-travelogue describing the New Yawk of 1981. I enjoyed this piece, its unflinching bursting of the idealist’s bubbles, really well-written. 

 

Poland – A Pilgrimage by Tod Benjamin (Dorset, UK)

A journey of discovery, seeking roots, following the map of memories and snippets of knowledge some of which have lasted eight decades. I was impressed and moved by this piece, and felt I was alongside as the experiences unfolded. 

 

Vanessa Gebbie’s notes on judging the Short Memoir Contest13498066_10154428703525353_4139227493653120180_o.

It was a joy to read the shortlist, and as ever, a difficult job to deselect work which was obviously well put together and fascinating to discover. It was an enormous privilege to judge a memoir competition – a very different experience to judging fiction, in that I felt constantly that I was being entrusted with glimpses into a life, and how hard it was to separate those glimpses into top ten and ‘the rest’. In the end though, with each read-through the top entries selected themselves for one reason or another. I was looking for terrific writing of course – something Fish attracts in spades, and I was richly rewarded right across the spectrum. I was looking for engagement, for that compelling element that drew me in and wouldn’t let me go until the piece was finished. And that ‘something indefinable’ which ensures that a piece of work speaks directly to you, stays with you and changes you slightly.

         The winning entry, “Pay Attention” stood out right from the start, and delivered on those criteria easily, and seemingly effortlessly. It is beautifully written, intimate and very atmospheric, a second person unfolding that draws the reader right in with exhortations to ‘come and see’, to ‘look’, watch’, as the writer describes in gorgeous, often disturbing prose, their childhood experiences of The Troubles. 

            …our house feels as though it has been lifted a few centimeters off the ground and dropped. All the radiators chime like tuning forks. We awake only to return to sleep.

         Listen to what my mother tells us: “It’s only a bomb”.

The refrain phrases ‘come and see’, ‘look’ and ‘watch’ are not only hugely successful stylistically, drawing me in to be a bystander in the episodes described, but are an echo of the school reader books of the time.  They are a constant gentle reminder that these events are being recalled from childhood, that the things a child sees and remembers may differ from those of an adult. Characters from the memories step into the spotlight and live again, opening up into wonderfully observed descriptions of place:

           My grandmother takes snuff, swears and removes her false teeth in public. She eats so many cinnamon Imperials that she smells of cinnamon and she swigs her tea from an old glass tankard.

This is where she lives: Her terraced house overlooks the park. To one side of the park is an orchard that runs behind the Victorian parochial house, which in turn sits behind the great stone snail of the Sacred Heart Church.

Disturbing events are related with a directness and simplicity which throws their horror into stark relief:

I remember the pylons with electricity singing in their ears, the whole world lush, green and cold, and a naked boy. His hands cover his crotch. His howling mouth is a red circle and his eyes are screwed up into crow’s-feet. He crosses the field towards us. He is as pale as candle wax.

I could go on and on, pulling out examples, to show you why I loved this piece. I haven’t yet said how beautiful some of the scenes are. So read it. Look. Go and see. And join me in congratulating this writer, whoever it be.

Second, ‘The Master’, was by far the shortest in the shortlist and a terrific piece, the tale of a failed student priest who becomes a lorry driver in his father’s demolition firm. It is a great example of ‘less is more’. The writer approaches the events with clarity, with wry humour and fabulous characterisation, as the experiences of this very gritty job are contrasted with the gentle life of the priesthood.

The glimmering wetness of pot-holes brimming after rain and the roar of the crane conspired to make me think I was Dante being led by Virgil into Hell. I was led instead to a squat tipper truck. Behind the windscreen, a Daily Mirror twitched and a cap bobbed. Maurice banged on the driver’s door.

     “Get out of that, you dirty auld Mayo whore and show a bit of respect.”

Thus the eponymous ‘master’ is introduced – the wonderful Paddy Walshe – once met, never forgotten. I particularly loved the thoughtfulness of this piece, especially the concluding thought – that acts of love are found in unexpected places, and everywhere.

And third place, ‘Sand on the Mountain’, is a very atmospheric, beautifully written account of a young family buying a run-down Welsh hill farm, something from another era, and the neighbours – everything superbly evoked, drawing me right in, bringing a lost generation into striking view. The characters in this piece are marvellously alive – much enjoyed – I won’t forget this one in a hurry.

Seven more – all of which I commend to you as great examples of memoir, marvellous, generous glimpses into the writers’ lives. As an adopted adult myself, I was drawn to the unflinching bravery of both ‘Dear Eilis’ and ‘Sound of Stone’ which explore connected experiences from opposite ends of the spectrum. I appreciated the controlled emotion beneath them both, their lack of sentimentality and freshness on what is after all a well-trodden path. It was that sense of ‘newness’ that drew me to ‘Baggage’ and ‘What Remains’ too – firstly the decluttering of an elderly parent beginning a shift for the narrator, and secondly a glimpse of dementia via a simple conversation. Both memorable, poignant, and straight. ‘Elbow Grease’ is a contrast – I loved the humour here. ‘New York City 1981’ was a surprise – an undoing of all the cliches surrounding the Big Apple. And finally , ‘Polish PIlgrimage’ – a compelling journey of discovery later in life.

I hope you enjoy them all, and will join me in congratulating all these wonderful writers. And a reminder to ‘The Rest’. Just because I didn’t choose your piece in the top ten does not mean it isn’t very good indeed. To get to a Fish shortlist is an achievement in itself, and any judge will acknowledge the element of subjectivity in their final choices. There was not a single one I didn’t enjoy – they were all terrific reads – thank you.

End.

 

Biographies:

Paul McGranaghan

Paul McGranaghan was born in Derry and began growing up in Strabane. He studied Zoology in Manchester, worked as a microbiologist near Aberystwyth, Wales, and as a Neuroscientist, again in Manchester. He has travelled throughout Ireland and Europe, living for a year in Italy and two years in Spain. He has been published as a prize-winning travel/nature writer by the BBC, and in Literary Orphans, Paragraphiti, The Corner Club Press and Lowestoft Chronicle. He was recently short-listed by the Irish Times for Travel Writer of the Year. He lives in Dublin, where he enjoys receiving gifts.

 

Yom FinniganTom Finnigan is an Irish citizen with a Manchester accent. Married to Susie, he has three children and five grandchildren. Buying and selling cranes gives him a living. He came to Donegal in 2001 and joined Derry Playhouse Writers. He likes to evoke a sense of place in what he writes. BBC Radio Ulster and RTE Lyric FM have broadcast some of his stories; a few have featured in magazines.

 

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When Mary Griese lived with her husband and two young children on a remote Welsh hill farm on the Black Mountain, she was sheep farming, writing about sheep and painting commissions of prize ewes and rams. There, she built up her arty business: ‘Slightly Sheepish’. She’s completed the MA in creative writing at Bath and published a picture book: An Alphabet of Farm Animals. She has two grandchildren and lives on a Somerset dairy farm.

 

Therese RyanTherese Ryan lives in Ballymote Co Sligo. She is a teacher and devotee of Iyengsr Yoga

 

 

C114_1359hris Mulvey left her workIn 1998, then forty, as a community educator and organiser in Dublin to follow a call from a mountain in Montana.  Sixteen years of cavorting with bison, grizzlies, wolves and wilderness led her to N. California where, with her husband, and still in the company of bears, raptors and tall trees, she’s participating with other writers, dancers and activists in America’s political awakening, gift of what lives for now, in Washington.

Martin Cromie

Martin Cromie is a 60 year old grandfather from Newry. Following early retirement from Education Administration, he gained an MA and PhD in Creative Writing from the Seamus Heaney Centre at Queens University Belfast. His non-fiction, fiction and poetry have appeared in journals, magazines and anthologies and he has been shortlisted for a number of Short Story Competitions. He hopes to have a full length work of Landscape Literature published in the near future.  

 

Barbara FriedBarbara Fried. By day, I am a law professor at Stanford University.  By night, weekend, and in other stolen moments, I write fiction.  Mostly I have no trouble telling day from night.  My stories have been published in Bellevue Literary Review, Subtropics, and Guernica, among other places. “After Henry” won Los Angeles Review’s 2016 Flash Fiction contest. “The Half-Life of Nat Glickstein” was chosen as a distinguished story of 2013 in Best American Short Stories. 

John Killeen

John Killeen. As Shakespeare put it; ‘There is a tide in the affairs of men, which, taken at the flood leads on to victory…’ The idea is; that if you don’t grab your chances in the moment they are presented, you end up in ‘the shallows’. That about describes my contact with The Irish Times in the early 1980s when Douglas Gageby offered me a job and I was not in a position take it.

Aneko Campbell

Aneko Campbell is a pseudonym. The author works in the field of mental health and has a
recurring fantasy that someone will pay her a large amount of money to listen to jokes all day.  In a previous incarnation, she has been published in a variety of print and online publications.

 

Tod New HavenTod Benjamin was born in London in 1936. After careers in retail management and chemicals, he retired from globe-trotting to enjoy voluntary work. While Chairman of Elmwood College he became an F.R.S.A., and from1993-1998 tutored numeracy and literacy in the Palm Beach County schools system in Florida. Then, he volunteered at Bournemouth Hospital, and still teaches an IT course on behalf of Age UK Bournemouth. Always a poet, Tod has at last, at eighty, become a published author.

 

Memoirs: Short & Long Lists 2017

March 29th, 2017 | Uncategorized | Comments Off on Memoirs: Short & Long Lists 2017

Short List: 2017 Short Memoir Contest.

The Long List is on this page after the short list.

The winners will be announced on 1st April.

Title

First Name

Last Name

     

May Sixty-Eight

Tony

Axelrad

Poland – A Pilgrimage

Tod

Benjamin

 

 

Learning How To Be A Lady

Jane

Bryce

New York 1981

Aneko

Campbell

 

 

Imprint

Zoe

Comyns

Baggage

Martin

Cromie

 

 

Tuppence for Your Tongue

Eanlai

Cronin

Safe Ground

Maebh

Culhane

The Master

Tom

Finnigan

What Remains

Barbara

Fried

 

 

My Eight-Snake Day

Renata

Golden

F.

Carlos

Gomez

 

 

Sand on the Mountain

Mary

Griese

Little Hurricane

D

Haslam

Forty-two Days

Gay

Johnson

Jack

Laura

Jones

Elbow Grease

John

Killeen

The Salt Story

John

Killeen

Out, Out Brief Candle

Sarah

MacLeod

Toasting with Water

Tracy

Maylath

Clearview

Andrew

Maynard

My Summer of Larkin

Anna

McGrail

Pay Attention

Paul

McGranaghan

 

 

Sound of Stone

Cris

Mulvey

 

 

A White Lie at Christmas

Eithne

Nightingale

Learning To Live; Not Just Survive

Colleen

O’Mara

Sting

Mary

Pecaut

The inadequacy of crew

Marianne

Puxley

Earth Enough

Janey

Runci

Dear Eilis

Therese

Ryan

 

 

A letter

BEATRIZ

SANTANA

Cool Factor Zero

Jessica

Tuckwell

Look Straight Ahead

Clare

Weze

Lie

Pamela

Woolford

           

Long List: 2017 Short Memoir Contest.

 

 

 

Common Experiences

Geraldine

Anslow

May Sixty-Eight

Tony

Axelrad

I Belong to Glasgow

Gavin

Bell

Poland – A Pilgrimage

Tod

Benjamin

Don’t Think About It

Lucinda

Birch

My Book of Airports:

LHR Heathrow

Mark

Blackburn

A Lady Never Tells

Sonya

Blanck

Family Photos.

William

Bogle

Jamie Paul Davis And His

Three Fingers

David

Brennan

Of Guns and Cutlery:

Memories of the War

Hans

Brinckmann

Battle Scars

Michelle

Brock

Learning How To Be A Lady

Jane

Bryce

Home

Andrea

Burn

Days of Fuchsia and Aquamarine

Debby

Cameron

New York 1981

Aneko

Campbell

Telling Mavis

Patricia

Carrigan

Inklings

Judith

Charlton

Imprint

Zoe

Comyns

Digging Up The Past

Martin

Cromie

Baggage

Martin

Cromie

Tuppence for Your Tongue

Eanlai

Cronin

Oh Canada!

Rowena

Cross

Safe Ground

Maebh

Culhane

Peace Garden

Elizabeth

Cummings

INVADING A COUNTRY

ANTHONY

DANDY

Lost at 15, found at 50:
Memoir of a Globetrotter

Ashwini

Devare

A Foreign Body

Elizabeth

Diamond

Sunday In Navatu Village

Jamie

Dickson

Tantura

Linda

Dittmar

My Englishman

Susanne

Ehrhardt

A Story of More

Anna

Elkins

Terraced Memories

Guy

Evans

The Master

Tom

Finnigan

Break My Heart – A Christmas
Road Trip In Japan

Nicholas

Fitzgerald

What Remains

Barbara

Fried

Doubling Back

Joanne

Godley

Somehow

Renny

Golden

My Eight-Snake Day

Renata

Golden

F.

Carlos

Gomez

Aino Yehudi

Victoria

Goodsir

Sand on the Mountain

Mary

Griese

Two, If By Sea

Meran

Hall

The Bella Boys

George

Harding

Looking for Business

John

Harris

Every Thought of my Reason

John

Harris

Kit Carson

John

Harris

Little Hurricane

D

Haslam

An Emotional Nudist’s Apologia

Louis

Hemmings

Ruby Lips and Emerald Fields

Andrea

Herrmann

God and the Subcutis

Andre

Hess

Tables

Maureen

Hossbacher

Snippets from Enchanted Exile

Deborah

Hunter

My Unexpected Journey

Alex

James

NOW THAT YOU ARE HERE

Sandra

Jensen

Chemopause

Kate

Jiggins

Forty-two Days

Gay

Johnson

Jack

Laura

Jones

Pilgrimage to Bethlehem March 2002

Mary

Kelly

Elbow Grease

John

Killeen

The Salt Story

John

Killeen

Titled

Alex

King

Pocket-Size Stories and a
Few One-liners

Susan

Landgraf

Grave Choices

Kate

Lawrence

Out, Out Brief Candle

Sarah

MacLeod

A Tinge of Yellow

Margaret

Madden

Toasting with Water

Tracy

Maylath

Man Overboard

Andrew

Maynard

Clearview

Andrew

Maynard

Who Will Take This Holy Water

Sarah

McClung

Orange People Tea: A Memoire

Jim

McDonald

My Summer of Larkin

Anna

McGrail

Pay Attention

Paul

McGranaghan

Sweet Smoky Dream

Kathryn

McGrath

My Life With Pascoli

Rosemary

McLeish

Encountering Gorkha

Mary Anne

Mercer

Studio Time

Holly

Moffitt

Wittgenstein

Pete

Morriss

The thin blue line

John

Mulligan

Sound of Stone

Cris

Mulvey

A White Lie at Christmas

Eithne

Nightingale

A WEEKEND

Mary

O’Donnell

“Learning To Live; Not Just Survive”

Colleen

O’Mara

Boots, Bloody Boots (1916)

Kath

O’Sullivan

In the Company of Shiva

Suzanne

Ohlmann

The Intervention

Beverly

Parayno

Family Trees

Cassandra

Passarelli

Sting

Mary

Pecaut

Ignoring Andromaque

Ian

Plenderleith

Halls, Bulls and Mirrored Walls

Alison

Pritchard

The inadequacy of crew

Marianne

Puxley

Earth Enough

Janey

Runci

Dancing With The Dead

Jacob

Russell

Dear Eilis

Therese

Ryan

Red Lurex and the Jesus Lady (2)

Poppy

Sall

A letter

BEATRIZ

SANTANA

When the Ape is King

Peter

Sheal

Disordered

Amy

Simonson

Culture Shock

Keith

Spragg

Bio-Frau

Katie

Thayer

Cool Factor Zero

Jessica

Tuckwell

Water and Light

Hannah

van Didden

Know

Rebecca

Van Horn

Encounter

Rose

van Son

A Huffy and a Prayer

Deena

Walechka

and spoke the language
that I spoke at home

Kathryn

Walker

Good Nite Moon

Tracey

Weddle

Wizards and Wisteria

Bethany

Westwood

Look Straight Ahead

Clare

Weze

Mill Cottage

Hilary

White

A Letter to my Unborn Grandchildren

Stuart

Williams

Forty Years

Mat

Woolfenden

Lie

Pamela

Woolford

Chink

Ruth

Wyer

 

 

 

 

Fish Publishing, Durrus, Bantry, Co. Cork, Ireland

COPYRIGHT 2016 FISH PUBLISHING